Catelogue of Courses (including Course Syllabi)

Catalogue of Courses (including Course Syllabi)

The didactic component of psychoanalytic training at the Center is informed by principles of theoretical pluralism and critical thinking. One sequence of seminars that runs through the four years of coursework is devoted to the study of psychoanalytic theory. This sequence takes the works of Freud as its starting point and follows an historically organized study of theoretical developments. The works of Klein and contemporary Kleinians, the British Independents, Bion, contemporary Freudians, French psychoanalytic texts, the American Relationalists and contemporary object relations theorists are taught in depth. Concurrent with this sequence, are courses in clinical practice that run throughout the four years. These courses begin with basic concepts having to do with therapeutic action, beginning psychoanalytic treatment, analytic process, and dreams and continue in later years to study primitive states, severe psychopathology, and trauma. Courses in the psychoanalytic understanding of development begin in the first year of coursework and continue through the early academic years. These courses include the study of infant observation, attachment theory, gender and object choice, oedipal and post-oedipal stages of development.

The close examination of ongoing cases in psychoanalytic treatment is undertaken in case conferences which continue throughout all years of the curriculum. The case conference offered in the first year is exclusively for first year candidates. The continuous case conferences offered in subsequent years include a mix of candidates from the second, third, and fourth years. This provides candidates the opportunity to work closely with candidates from different classes. This integration of candidate cohorts continues in three other seminar contexts: 1) the Visiting Professor week, in which a noted psychoanalyst outside the Center is invited to teach candidates and offer programs to graduate members of the Center; 2) Electives, in which candidates choose from courses offered by faculty of the Center which take up topics of special interest; and 3) the annual Intersession: a three week program that takes up a topic of applied psychoanalysis.

The curriculum concludes with a course offered after the four year sequence, in which candidates formulate and develop a paper in a working group of fellow candidates and with the participation of a faculty mentor.

Below is a list of the coursework, organized by year.  Please click on the Year title to expand its content.

Click here to download entire Year 1 Schedule in Excel format.

8:00am - 09:30am

  • Theory of Technique: Introduction to Theory of Therapeutic Action (download syllabus)
    September 5, 12, 19, 26; October 3, 10, 17, 24, 31, 2015
    9 Sessions
    Steven Goldberg, MD

    This course will highlight central controversies in the theory of therapeutic action in psychoanalysis, and will trace their evolution historically from early contributions through contemporary thinkers. We will consider ongoing debates about the primacy of interpretation versus the analytic relationship, the importance of reconstruction and memory as opposed to current experience, and the relative value of consistency versus flexibility in psychoanalytic technique. We will read papers on questions essential to the psychoanalytic process: transference, countertransference, resistance, interpretation and non-interpretation. We will end with a discussion of mental representations, and questions of the extent to which an internal world is discovered versus co-created during psychoanalytic treatment.  Our discussions will include the place of psychoanalytic theory in the mind of the analyst, and will seek to elucidate the conscious and unconscious processes within the analyst that contribute to therapeutic change.  We will touch on the limited base of empirical research relevant to questions of what is curative in the psychoanalytic process.
     

  • Beginning an Analysis (download syllabus)
    November 7, 21; December 5, 12, 19, 2014; January 9, 23, 30, 2015
    8 Sessions
    William C. Glover, PhD

    The purpose of this clinical seminar is to assist candidates in thinking about and dealing with the complex issues involved in beginning an analysis. The focus will be on the anxieties and resistances of both patient and analyst to the recommendation of analysis and in the opening phase of treatment. The question of analyzability and various technical issues will also be addressed. Readings will be assigned for each week and there will be case presentations by both faculty and participants to highlight the issues under discussion.
     

  • Conviction, Conversion, and Building a Psychoanalytic Practice (download syllabus)
    February 6, 13, 20, 27; March 6, 13, 20, 27, 2015
    8 Sessions
    Zenobia Grusky, PhD

    How can beginning analysts develop their evolving analytic identities so that they can effectively communicate to their patients what they believe in about analytic work? Beginning to talk about psychoanalysis to psychotherapy patients is about learning the state of mind that is necessary for being an analyst, about developing formulations that feel real to the patient and the analyst. This starts right away, as soon as the patient walks in the door, even if the recommendation for analysis or greater frequency doesn’t happen for quite a while.

    This class will focus on the consolidation of the analyst’s internal state of mind about why analysis is the right choice for a given patient. Ideas and stereotypes about conversion techniques that use suggestion or idealization of the analyst’s authority rather than careful interpretation based on understanding the patients dynamics will also be discussed. Candidates will observe the beginning of an analysis (and/or the development of a conversion process), in detail, by looking at case material of their own as well as cases presented by the instructor.
     

  • Elements of Psychoanalytic Process (download syllabus)
    April 10, 17, 24; May 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, June 12, 2015
    9 Sessions
    Adam Goldyne, M.D.

    “Psychoanalytic process” is a concept at the heart of our literature.  It connotes a sense of forward movement and engagement in the psychoanalytic couple, but its nature, despite having been conceptualized in myriad ways, remains elusive.  In whom and in what space does it occur?  How are we to relate it to technique and to psychic experience?  Can it be treated as ‘present’ or ‘absent’ in the service of accreditation or research?  How do we think about it in an alive way that is grounded in experience, rather than in a distant or deadening way?  Starting with Freud and working our way forward, we will read a series of articles that lend themselves to exploration of these and related questions.

 

09:45am - 11:15am

  • Freud - Part I (download syllabus)
    September 5, 12, 19, 26; October 3, 10, 17, 24, 2014
    8 Sessions
    John Jemerin, MD

    In this course we will explore Freud’s discovery of psychoanalysis, and the subsequent evolution of his clinical and technical approach.  We will seek to delineate the fundamental and enduring insights that differentiate psychoanalytic therapy from other kinds of treatment.  Through an examination of selected clinical case studies, papers on clinical theory, and technical papers, we will attempt to elucidate some of Freud’s early clinical and technical insights that have remained central to psychoanalytic practice today, and that have continued to inspire comment and controversy within the evolving and contemporary psychoanalytic dialogue.  Selected readings from Freud’s work will be paired with recent or current papers in the psychoanalytic literature to provide illustrations of the way that the ongoing broad and diverse psychoanalytic discourse continues in many ways to be engaged in active conversation with some of Freud’s early clinical and technical conceptualizations.
     

  • Freud - Part II (download syllabus)
    October 31; November 7, 21; December 5, 12, 19, 2014; January 9, 23, 2015
    8 Sessions
    Israel Katz, MD

    Freud writes a series of texts, as he is nearing 60 and living through the Great War, in which he tries to clarify psychoanalytic experience by articulating general principles about the unconscious. We will examine these speculations and hypotheses, and will also discuss the papers on narcissism and beyond the pleasure principle, two major points of inflection in Freud’s work.
     

  • Freud - Part III (download syllabus)
    January 30; February 6, 13, 20, 27; March 6, 13, 20, 2015
    8 Sessions
    J. Samuel Chase, MD

    In this seminar a careful reading of Freud’s major writings from the Structural Theory to later in his career will examine the shift from the Topographic Model to the Structural Model with the profound impacts on psychoanalytic theory and technique that resulted from this shift.  Then we will spend a couple weeks reading later Freud so see where he went after 1923 with his theory of the mind. 

    This reading will provide a basis for discussion of how these developments in Freud’s thinking led to contemporary Freudian theory, as well as to the issues that resulted in the branching off of other theoretical models, such as Kleinian, object relations, and relational.
     

  • Interdisciplinary Studies
    March 27, 2015 and April 10, 2015
    2 Sessions
     
  • Emergence of Object Relations Theories (download syllabus)
    April 17, 24; May 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, 2015
    7 Sessions
    Laurie Case, PhD

    Karl Abraham and Sandor Ferenczi developed original formulations and extensions of Freud’s work.  Abraham moved toward a theory of internal fantasies of self, objects and what they do to one another.  Ferenczi, by contrast, focused on the impact of the actual relationship between a mother and her baby, therapist and patient.  We will trace how their ideas set the stage for two distinct schools of British object relations theories.  Moving from the psychoanalytic milieu of the early 1900s, we will consider the controversial discussions and, in their wake, the development of the Kleinian and Middle Schools.  As time allows we will explore contemporary interpretations of these sometimes complementary and sometimes divergent points of view, with particular emphasis on the conceptualization of narcissism.

12:15pm - 01:45pm

  • First Year Case Conference
    September 5, 12, 19, 26; October 3, 10, 17, 24, 31; November 7, 21; December 5, 12, 19, 2014
    14 Sessions
    Abby Wolfson, PhD
     
  • Candidates Association Meeting
    January 9, 2015
     
  • Medication and Psychoanalysis (download syllabus)
    January 23, 30; February 6, 2015
    3 Sessions
    Mark Swoiskin, MD

    This course will begin by examining some of the broad conceptual issues relevant to the challenge of combining psychopharmacologic considerations with psychoanalytic theory and technique:  the enormous array of meanings which the use and non-use of medications may have for both patients and clinicians, the difficulties involved in trying simultaneously to consider both dynamic and pharmacologic issues, methods in distinguishing between pharmacologically-mediated and meaning-mediated/placebo effects, etc.  We will also consider the question of whether or not psychological meanings and processes should influence the decision of whether or not to use medication, along with the challenge of trying to analyze such meanings and processes when medications are being used.  Finally, we will focus on issues which arise when the analyst and the pharmacologist are two different people, such as differing views of etiology and cure, communication between clinicians, split transferences, etc. Extensive clinical illustrations will be used.
     

  • Dreamwork/Dreaming (download syllabus)
    February 13, 20, 27; March 6, 13, 20, 2015
    6 Sessions
    Catherine E. McKenzie, PhD

    The focus of this course will be to develop a sense of the clinical presence of dreaming. In each class we will make use of our patients' dreaming as presented in clinical hours.  Readings will provide a backdrop to stimulate our understanding of dreaming and how we make use of this process in our clinical work.
     

  • Interdisciplinary Studies
    March 27, 2015 and April 10, 2015
    2 Sessions
     
  • Character (download syllabus)
    April 17, 24; May 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, 2015
    7 Sessions
    Holly Gordon, DMH

    In this course, we will examine the concept of character as it emerged from clinical dilemmas, both in case formulation and challenges to technique. We’ll explore the utility of this form of conceptualizing a constellation of clinical difficulties. Readings will cover different character types as they are conceptualized, and technically navigated, by different writers in contemporary psychoanalysis.
    Our goals will be:

    1) To understand the development of psychoanalytic ideas about character and their derivation from clinical dilemmas

    2) To become familiar with theories and techniques associated with different character types, as they are discussed in current literature, from a variety of psychoanalytic viewpoints

 

08:00am - 01:45pm (Full Day)

  • Visiting Professor
    November 14, 2014
    Virginia Ungar, MD

 

Click here to download entire Year 2 Schedule in Excel format

8:00am - 09:30am

  • A Study in Infant Observation (download syllabus)
    September 5, 12, 19, 26; October 3, 10, 2014
    6 Sessions
    Celeste Schneider, PhD

    This seminar will consider earliest child development and the states of mind of babies and their caregivers through literature and transcripts of infant observations. We will engage in a close reading of transcripts of observational data, discuss the phenomenological experiences of the infants and caregivers, and explore clinical and theoretical implications of these vivid observations for child and adult psychotherapy.
     

  • Early Childhood Development (download syllabus)
    October 17, 24, 31; November 7, 21; December 5, 12, 19, 2014
    8 Sessions
    Era A. Loewenstein, PhD

    In this seminar we will sample and review a wide range of perspectives on contemporary object relation theory. Building on mother-infant observation, attachment theory and research as well as the contributions of Ferenczi, Winnicott, Bion and Meltzer we will link experiences in early childhood to the transference-countertransference in child and adult psychoanalytic treatment. We will address the impact of child-parent affect regulation and affect dysregulation on subsequent healthy and pathological states of mind. We will discuss verbal and non-verbal transmission of parental internal object world into the child and its relationship to the formation of the child’s unconscious phantasy.
     
    We will study effective and faulty containment, invasive objects and their relationship to early unmentalized states, including dissociation and nameless dread. We will also learn about secure and disorganized modes of attachments and their relationship to dissociation and transgenerational transmission of trauma. We will examine these themes by reading selected contributions by Ferenczi, Winnicott, Martha Harris, Joan Symigton and Donald Meltzer. Findings from contemporary psychoanalytic informed research by Fonagy and Target and longitudinal studies by Lyons-Ruth will be discussed. These various themes will be demonstrated weekly as we read together a number of books written and/or illustrated by Maurice Sendak.
     

  • Oedipal Development (download syllabus)
    January 9, 23, 30; February 6, 13, 20, 27; March 6, 2015
    8 weeks
    Jed Sekoff, PhD

    Oedipus is at the crossroads of psychoanalytic theorizing. Theories of sexuality, gender, ego functioning, phantasy, psychic structure, drives, object relations, superego formation, and ‘thirdness’ among others, cast Oedipal themes as a central dynamic. In this seminar, we will look at the Oedipus complex as a core dynamic of human development, as well as the development of Oedipus as a core theory of psychoanalysis. Readings will be drawn from various dialects of psychoanalysis: Classical Freudian, Kleinian, Ego Psychology, Develop-mental Theory, Object Relations, and the French Freudians. A foray into children’s literature will accompany the class.
     

  • Clinical Formulation: Writing as a Means of Thinking (download syllabus)
    March 13, 20, 27; April 10, 17, 2015
    5 Sessions
    Beth Steinberg, PhD

    In this course we will attempt to free ourselves to write with as little internal criticism as possible so that we can begin to feel free to put something of our experiences in the clinical situation into language. We will read several pieces of writing to stimulate our imaginations and expose ourselves to different styles and voices. We will write several pieces with the goals of writing freely and trying to communicate something of our experiences in an engaging and lively way.

    There will be brief writing assignments required for each class which will be shared with the group, As a working group we will discuss the process of writing and the experience of reading and listening.  In the first class, we will do a free writing exercise in class.  For subsequent classes, you will complete the assignment before class. Please come prepared in classes 2-5 with enough copies of your assignment to distribute to the class and me.  We will not have time for everyone to read their piece each week, but we will rotate; those who do read in class will make notes of the class’ feedback, and those do not will hand in their pieces to me for feedback.
     

  • Child Psychoanalysis
    April 24; May 1, 8, 15, 22, 29; June 12, 2015
    7 Sessions
    Janis Baeuerlen, MD and Christina Lapides, LCSW

    This year’s program will offer candidates continued exposure to several Kleinian, Anna Freudian and Winnicottian analysts, via teleconferencing. This has been a successful program over the past several years. Anne Alvarez, Anne-Marie Sandler, Robin Anderson and Mirta and Robert Oelsner will once again listen to candidates’ case material as the starting point for teaching many aspects of technique with children and adolescents and their parents. The instructors will also suggest readings as we go along, to enrich the material and fill in the theory as topics come up. As before, we expect a wide range of issues to be covered in this way.

    The particular focus this year will be gender – its development and difficulties that may arise in development as they appear in our clinical work. Tina Lapides, Jan Baeuerlen, and Marsha Silverstein will start to cover this broad topic when the year begins, making use of clinical cases and articles; and our non-local faculty will also suggest articles in the literature as their seminar sequences begin.

09:45am - 11:15am

  • Introduction to the Work of Melanie Klein (download syllabus)
    September 5, 12, 19, 26; October 3, 10, 17, 24, 2014
    8 Sessions
    Margo Chapin, MFT

    In this introductory course on Melanie Klein, we will use Mrs. Klein’s original theoretical and clinical papers along with contemporary papers to study Melanie Klein’s central theoretical concepts. We will begin with her discovery of the psychoanalytic play-technique, which she felt was equivalent to free association in the adult. We will use a close-reading process of Melanie Klein’s clinical work with Erna along with theoretical papers to consider her use of unconscious phantasy, her discoveries of the early oedipal complex, the archaic super-ego, and symbol formation. In the second half of the course, we will consider the anxiety, defenses and object relations of the depressive and the paranoid-schizoid positions. We will end the course studying her last major contribution to psychoanalysis, Envy and Gratitude.
     

  • The Independent School (download syllabus)
    October 31; November 7, 21; December 5, 12, 19, 2014; January 9, 23, 30, 2015
    9 Sessions
    Michael K. Smith, PhD

    Controversies over theory and technique in the early years of the British Psychoanalytical Society led to the designation of a "Middle" (later "Independent") group of psychoanalysts who declined to align themselves exclusively either with the ideas of Melanie Klein or with those of Anna Freud. As a group they have been linked less by shared theoretical convictions and more by shared clinical interests and by a shared set of values and sensibilities. From study of the transferences of more disturbed and deeply regressed patients they developed the theory of object relations. They attach importance to environmental influences on development and accept regression as a central feature of analytic treatment. They emphasize the importance of a close understanding of the patient's experience and the importance of the analyst's self-understanding. They eschew rigid ideas about theory and technique in favor of an elastic approach meant to encompass as fully as possible the particular history, presentation, needs, and experience of the analysand.

    In this seminar we will explore readings from Fairbairn, Michael Balint, and Winnicott, and from several less commonly read and more recent authors. Our goals will be to understand the central notions that these authors seek to convey and their applicability in the clinical setting, and to understand what it might mean to identify oneself with the Independent Tradition in the contemporary psychoanalytic context.
     

  • Electives*
    February 6, 13, 20, 27; March 6, 13, 20, 2015
    7 weeks
     
  • Interdisciplinary Studies
    March 27, 2015 and April 10, 2015
    2 Sessions
     
  • Bion
    April 17, 24; May 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, 2015
    7 Sessions
    Lee Rather, PhD

    The work of Wilfred Bion is highly original, evocative, and far-reaching in its epistemological, developmental and clinical implications. Bion’s theory of thinking has stirred widespread interest, and concepts such as alpha-function, container-contained, reverie, and the L, H, and K links have proven relatively user-friendly. However, due to his manner of exposition and the uniqueness of his perspective, much of Bion’s ensuing work can be difficult to approach. The purpose of this course is to build upon familiar concepts in order to introduce participants to ideas developed in Bion’s later work, particularly in Attention and Interpretation. Using the myths of Oedipus, Eden, and Babel, as well as Bion’s myth of ‘the mystic and the group’, we will examine the nature of anxiety, the fear of psychic growth, and the concept of ‘O’ and its transformations along the co-ordinates of The Grid. Considering psychoanalytic theories in relation to Bion’s concepts of the Language of Achievement and Lies and the Thinker, we will also examine the inevitable resistances to psychoanalysis in our patients, ourselves, and our institutions.

12:15pm - 01:45pm

  • The Analytic Process: Towards a Framework for Organizing and Presenting Clinical Material (download syllabus)
    September 5, 12, 19, 26; October 3, 10, 17, 2014
    7 Sessions
    Eric Glassgold, MD and Janice Mill, PhD

    This seminar focuses on the interplay of fundamental analytic functions, most notably analytic listening, conceiving, and interpreting.  One of several courses in the clinical track on technique, the seminar immediately precedes and seeks to prepare you for your case conference series.

    The class is divided into two sections.  In the first section (classes 1, 2, and 3) we will lay out a framework for thinking about what is meant by the term analytic process.  David Tuckett in his 2005 paper “Does Anything Go…” asks: “what is it that a psychoanalyst must do to function as an analyst and how can this be demonstrated?”  He conceives of three capacities of the analyst: the capacity to create and maintain a participant-observer stance, a conceptual frame, and an interventional frame.  We will utilize Tuckett's framework to help us identify and track an analytic process.  In the third class we will look at ways to create and develop a narrative to demonstrate an analytic process both in our own minds and in our case write-ups.

    In the second section of the course (class 4, 5 and 6) we will build upon and critically examine the framework for tracking an analytic process discussed in section 1.  First, we will examine findings of research projects designed by British and European analysts to identify fundamental elements that define a psychoanalytic treatment.  We will proceed to look closely at material from two psychoanalyses.  As we proceed, we will discuss how the defining elements allow us to organize our thoughts about and assess the quality of each analyst’s work. The first of the two treatments is a detailed, published account of the evolution of a psychoanalytic treatment by the British analyst Paul Williams.  The second is a psychoanalysis in progress with an SFCP faculty member, who will visit our seminar to present the case.   For both treatments, we will explore the effect the material is having on us, entertain inferences about the transference/countertransference phenomena, and consider hypotheses regarding appropriate lines of interpretation. We will make use of our own impressions as we compare the approach and interventions of each presenting analyst.

    At our last session (#7), we will integrate the perspectives developed in each half of the course with a second look at the process of interpretation.
     

  • Case Conference #1
    October 24; November 7, 21; December 5, 12, 19, 2014
    7 Sessions
    James Dimon, MD
     
  • Candidates Association Meeting
    January 9, 2015
     
  • Case Conference #2
    January 23, 30; February 6, 13, 20, 27; March 6, 13, 20, 2015
    9 Sessions
    Henry Markman, MD
     
  • Interdisciplinary Studies
    March 27, 2015 and April 10, 2015
    2 Sessions
     
  • Case Conference #3
    April 17, 24; May 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, 2015
    7 Sessions
    Peter Goldberg, PhD
     
  • Child and Adult Case Conference
    October 24, 31; November 7, 21, December 5, 12, 19, 2014
    7 Sessions
    Lee Grossman, MD and Louis Roussel, PhD

    January 23, 30; February 6, 13, 20, 27; March 6, 13, 20; April 17, 24, May 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, 2015
    16 Sessions
    Julie Ruskin, PhD and Ann Martini, LCSW

 

08:00am - 01:45pm (Full Day)

  • Visiting Professor
    November 14, 2014
    Virginia Ungar, MD

 

Electives*

  • An Introduction to Psychoanalytic Field Theory
    Georgine Marrott, PhD

    As the basis of our discussion we will participate as a group in a close reading of the seminal paper by Madeleine and Willy Baranger: “The Analytic Situation as a Dynamic Field.”  We will consider the implications for the analytic situation when it is configured as a dynamic, bi-personal field along with what occurs within the analytic pair when it is formulated in bi-personal terms.  We will have an opportunity to become familiar with some of the key concepts in the Barangers' work—“bastions,” “the point of urgency”, "interpretation as a mobilizer of the field" as well as with their particular construction of unconscious phantasy in the analytic pair.  Links with the field theory implicit in Bion’s work as well as with the work of contemporary analysts such as Ferro and Civitarese can also be explored.

    An important question we will consider is, how does a shift to a field theory model affect our listening and our thinking about our own experience in the analytic situation along with our patients' experience?  In other words, what might be the differences in mental attitude of both analyst and patient depending on whether  there  is a stage theory (e.g., a linear progression from a pre-oedipal to oedipal level) or a field theory conception active in the analytic situation?  These considerations can facilitate our staying close to the text as well as to our own clinical experience in the discussion.
     

  • Extreme Scenes and Screen Memories: A Memorium to Ruth Stein in Cinema and Psychoanalysis (download syllabus)
    Sue Saperstein, MFT, PsyD

    Ruth Stein’s well-known characterization of sexuality as poignant, excessive and enigmatic (Stein, 1998) deploys terms equally applicable to cinema in its narrative, formal and emotional dimensions. It is indisputable that the greatest films are emotionally compelling, intense and mysterious and that the experience of film in general derives from these qualities, which may accompany those of screen memories and dreams. (Freud, 1899, 1900). If psychoanalytic theory helps us to understand film phenomenology, elements of film combine to generate aesthetic experience that also further enrich our psychoanalytic understanding. Not only are film narratives often vehicles for illustrating psychopathology (particularly perversion and trauma), but also editing and shot composition (dis/continuity, framing, shifts in point of view, attention to details, etc.) can render primary and secondary thought-processes transparent; while imagery powerfully depicts an inner-object world and its interdependence on the dynamics of relationships and the impact of culture.

    This course aims to develop these premises, to memorialize Ruth Stein and to familiarize students with Stein’s seminal work, with a particular focus on her theory of affects at the core of human sexuality, perversion and trauma. Classes will alternate reading NS discussing four of Stein’s papers and discussing a film (viewed in advance) including Shame, Talk to Her, and The Comfort of Strangers, selected to illuminate her works.
     

  • The Nature of "Respect" in Psychoanalytic Work (download syllabus)
    Mitchell Wilson, MD

    Imagine a patient tells you a dream in which he is joined at the hip by a Siamese twin that is sucking the vitality out of both of them. At the same time, this dream is told within a larger context in which details of the patient’s history of trauma are at play, very much in the room. As the analyst, what do you pay attention to and privilege: the dream? or do you wait and listen to how the dream is woven, or not, within this larger tapestry of trauma?

    Clinical psychoanalysis could arguably be conceptualized around this basic question: what do different schools of thought take to be that which “demands” respect. What is it, in the end, that brings a given analyst “up short,” in the presence of which this analyst says to herself: “Yes. I must pay attention to this." "I must think about this." "I must consider how to address this." Or, "I must remember this.” Also, on the other side of the question are statements like: “I can ignore this.” Or, “I can let that go. It’s of no moment.”  We all know that different schools of thought (we could also say different psychoanalytic communities) answer this question of respect in very different ways. We might think that these differences come down to how the unconscious is understood to manifest itself in the work. This is certainly true. But it is also true that concepts such as the frame/setting, safety, interpersonal negotiation, the analytic third as a joint creation, reverie, countertransference—all of these ideas or “things” (are they things?) are also, at times and for some analysts, treated as bedrock, as the final word on the matter, as worthy, in other words, of respect.

    Though I’ve couched this basic question of respect in heady language, the elective I have in mind will engage basic clinical questions and clinical approaches. We will read some classic papers that lay out particular perspectives on this question of what the analyst should pay attention to, in the end. None of these papers uses the word “respect,” but I would argue that this is what these analysts are talking about. Respect, as you might imagine, has a lot to do with ethics as well: as analysts, what is our felt obligation to our patients? So respect has something to do with reasons for why we do one thing rather than another (the basics of ethics).

    Likely readings will include:

    The Patient’s Speech (ego psychology):
    Jacob Arlow: “Stilted Listening: Psychoanalysis as Discourse.” Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 1995, pp. 215-233.
    Serge Leclaire: “On the ear with which one ought to listen.” In, Psychoanalysing: On the Order of the Unconscious and the Practice of the Letter. Stanford     University Press, 1998.

    The Countertransference/Projective Identification (neo-Kleinian):
    Michael Feldman: Projective identification: the analyst’s involvement. International Journal of Psychoanalysis, 1997, pp. 227-241.

    Independent School:
    Michael Parsons: Excerpts from, The Dove That Returns, The Dove That Vanishes: Paradox and Creativity in Psychoanalysis. Routledge, 2000.

 

Click here to download entire Year 3 Schedule in Excel format.

08:00am - 09:30am

  • Middle Childhood (download syllabus)
    September 5, 12, 19, 26; October 3, 10, 2014
    6 Sessions
    Maureen Anne Katz,MD

    Do the years between 5 and 11 impact the internal psychic realities of our patients: the formation and consolidation of aspects of their subjectivities? Should we consider them as a distant second to the importance of infancy and early childhood? Can we explain why?  The period of middle childhood--growing up from the end of early childhood around 5 to the beginning of adolescence around 11–is a period full of memories and passions for patients and analysts.  Despite the contemporary psychoanalytic focus on thinking, structures of the mind and formation of early object relations, many analysts consciously and unconsciously adhere to concrete ideas about what does or doesn't go on during these "middle" years. We have difficulty keeping a psychoanalytic focus on the the development of the mind from experiences of school and learning, family romances, consolidation of masculinities and femininities, gender play, ethnic and class identities, sibling relations, and the relationship to various capacities for sublimation via athletics and the arts. How could such a rich and important time of life be so absent from theorizing about fundamental psychic structuralization?  In this course, we will attempt to examine from a psychoanalytic lens the world within "the middle" years.  This is Defense Against the Dark Arts at SFCP: another year, another teacher.
     

  • The Developing Mind: Adolescence (download sylalbus)
    October 17, 24, 31; November 7, 21; December 5, 2014
    6 Sessions
    Michael Donner, PhD

    Judith Chused described how “Knowledge gained from child analysis can increase our capacity to use and respond to modes of communication other than speech, and to make contact with patients who are very frightened, resistant, or psychologically naive. In addition, it can increase our appreciation for the patient's view of therapy: for what he hears, what he understands, and how he learns.”

    Many of the pleasures and perturbations of adulthood are found in the adolescent period. Sexual maturation and a recapitulation of separation individuation have a profound effect on behavior, mood, identity, and thought. We will seek the child in the adolescent and the adolescent in the adult, explore the methods and understanding of child and adolescent analytic work and apply it to the constant loop of development that defines the transition from childhood to adolescent, and adolescent to adult.
     

  • The Process of Framing and the Act of Interpreting in the Analytic Setting (download syllabus)
    December 12, 19, 2014; January 9, 23, 30; February 6, 13, 2015
    7 Sessions
    John DiMartini, PhD

    This course will trace the interactive relationship between framing and interpretation as they emerge in the psychoanalytic dialogue. These ideas will challenge us to rescue the view of the frame from a static set of structures and rules that are either flexibly or rigidly applied, and consider the frame as a living organism that is constantly shaped and reshaped. In examining the frame we will focus on articulating primitive confusional anxieties and describe experiences dominated by sensory, autistic and non-symbolized states held in the structure of the frame. We will move from discussing the analytic frame and setting to integrating concepts of thirdness, and the analytic field emphasizing the non-symbolized, pre-projected, symbiotic, adhesive and sensory/ body influences inherent in interpretations. In focusing our attention on the “act of interpretation” we will explore ideas about what an interpretation is, how it is made and where it is located with the aim to free interpretation from its constraints to explain its value in the process of discovering and creating.
     

  • Obstacles to Change (download syllabus)
    February 20, 27; March 6, 13, 20, 27, 2015
    6 Sessions
    Lisa Buchberg, DMH

    This clinical seminar will study contributions in the psychoanalytic literature that address seemingly intractable difficulties in analytic process.  We will examine early conceptualizations of the so-called negative therapeutic reaction and its later reframing as transference/counter-transference impasse.   We will address psychic configurations which foreclose mourning; benign and malignant regression; perversion and sexualization; as well as the ways that analytic field theory and containment address themselves to the theme of forestalled analyses.
     

  • Gender & Sexualities: Developmental & Clinical Considerations
    April 10, 17, 24; May 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, 2015
    8 Sessions
    Gary Grossman, PhD

    Gender and sexuality are central aspects of our identity and sense of self, profoundly influencing our experience of, and relationship to, other people and society.  Efforts to understand the development and expressions of gender and sexuality through a psychoanalytic lens have been complex, varied and controversial, dating back to Freud’s earliest contributions.  Nowhere has the nature/nurture debate been more controversial, clinically, theoretically and culturally, than with gender and sexuality.

    In this course we will explore gender and sexuality as independent, yet intricately linked, and multiply determined components of human identity, experience and expression. We will read from the contemporary psychoanalytic literature to further our understanding of the development and emergence of gender identities and sexualities across the lifespan, along with evocative video clips.  Expressions of gender and sexuality within the therapeutic relationship will be emphasized in our discussions.

09:45am - 11:15am

  • Contemporary Freud Theory (download syllabus)
    September 5, 12, 19, 26; October 3, 10, 17, 24, 2014
    8 Sessions
    Charles Fisher, MD

    In our current psychoanalytic scene, there is a tendency to take Freudian psychoanalysis as the known and familiar background theory from which our contemporary field emerges.  In this course, we will make it new – examining sexuality, unconscious fantasy function, symbolic organizers of anxiety, and the image of the parent in the mind of the child within Contemporary Freudian Theory.
     

  • Contemporary Object Relations Theory in Three Sections (download syllabus)
    October 31; November 7, 21; December 5, 12, 19, 2014; January 9, 23, 30, 2015
    9 Sessions
    L. Eileen Keller, PhD

    In this course on “Contemporary Object Relations Theory” we will begin with selected roots of all contemporary object relations theory by studying some current thinking on Ferenczi’s role in the development of technique and the treatment of trauma. We will go onto think about Ferenczi’s influence on Klein and use Stephen Mitchell’s article to study the role of the object in Klein as well as Fairbairn. Balint’s work on technique and on the relationship to the object will be our third historical stop. Next, we will briefly consider field theory, a major influence on psychoanalytic thought and practice internationally. In the third section we will consider four major contemporary theorists, Green, Bollas, Brenman, and Ogden. We will use selected works of each to consider the place of the object in contemporary theory and the implications for technique. We will also consider several contemporary clinical articles to focus our questions: on what ground does this clinician stand? What are the implications of the clinical material presented? How do we understand the nature of the author’s clinical theory? And, how do we link the clinical theory to the theoretical ground?
     

  • Electives*
    February 6, 13, 20, 27; March 6, 13, 20, 2015
    7 Sessions
     
  • Interdisciplinary Studies
    March 27, 2015 and April 10, 2015
    2 Sessions
     
  • Modern Relational Theory (download syllabus)
    April 17, 24; May 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, 2015
    7 Sessions
    Neil Talkoff, PhD

    In this class, we will read papers illustrating contemporary Relational and Intersubjective models of mind and theories of technique, and how transference, resistance and enactment are conceptualized in a two-or-more person psychology. We will dis-cuss how Relational analysts work, historical roots of contemporary theory, and how the shift from the Classical, ego-psychological metapsychology to a model of minds working in, and meaning arrived at, in tension, opposition or collaboration with the mind of an “other” has opened new areas of psychological investigation, new insight into the roots of psychopathology, and most importantly, new ways of helping our patients under-stand themselves fully. As the mind of the analyst has become more fully a player on the psychoanalytic field, we are compelled to re-examine our understanding of self-disclosure and its utility in the co-creation of meaning, as well as the dilemma of mutual resistance it can equally foster.
    Clinical examples will be given and are encouraged.

12:15pm - 01:45pm

  • Psychoanalytic Writing (download syllabus)
    September 5, 12, 19, 26; October 3, 10, 17, 2014
    7 Sessions
    Susan Kolodny, DMH

    In this class we will focus on writing, including about cases, as an act of play and discovery. We will do weekly writings and look at what in them works for us.  We will read from a variety of genres—personal essays, poems, memoirs, and short fiction, analytic papers- to consider some of the many different ways one can write that are vivid and alive.  Participants will have a chance to think about what in writing, including psychoanalytic writing, engages them and what may constitute their own voice.
     

  • Case Conference #1
    October 24, 31; November 7, 21; December 5, 12, 19, 2014
    7 Sessions
    James Dimon, MD
     
  • Candidates Association Meeting
    January 9, 2015
     
  • Case Conference #2
    January 23, 30; February 6, 13, 20, 27; March 6, 13, 20, 2015
    9 Sessions
    Henry Markman, MD
     
  • Interdisciplinary Studies
    March 27, 2015 and April 10, 2015
    2 Sessions
     
  • Case Conference #3
    April 17, 24; May 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, 2015
    7 Sessions
    Peter Goldberg, PhD
     
  • Child / Adult Case Conference
    October 24, 31; November 7, 21, December 5, 12, 19, 2014
    7 Sessions
    Lee Grossman, MD and Louis Roussel, PhD

    January 23, 30; February 6, 13, 20, 27; March 6, 13, 20; April 17, 24, May 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, 2015
    16 Sessions
    Julie Ruskin, PhD and Ann Martini, LCSW

 

08:00am - 01:45pm (Full Day)

  • Visiting Professor
    November 14, 2014
    Virginia Ungar, MD

 

Electives*

  • An Introduction to Psychoanalytic Field Theory
    Georgine Marrott, PhD

    As the basis of our discussion we will participate as a group in a close reading of the seminal paper by Madeleine and Willy Baranger: “The Analytic Situation as a Dynamic Field.”  We will consider the implications for the analytic situation when it is configured as a dynamic, bi-personal field along with what occurs within the analytic pair when it is formulated in bi-personal terms.  We will have an opportunity to become familiar with some of the key concepts in the Barangers' work—“bastions,” “the point of urgency”, "interpretation as a mobilizer of the field" as well as with their particular construction of unconscious phantasy in the analytic pair.  Links with the field theory implicit in Bion’s work as well as with the work of contemporary analysts such as Ferro and Civitarese can also be explored.

    An important question we will consider is, how does a shift to a field theory model affect our listening and our thinking about our own experience in the analytic situation along with our patients' experience?  In other words, what might be the differences in mental attitude of both analyst and patient depending on whether  there  is a stage theory (e.g., a linear progression from a pre-oedipal to oedipal level) or a field theory conception active in the analytic situation?  These considerations can facilitate our staying close to the text as well as to our own clinical experience in the discussion.
     

  • Extreme Scenes and Screen Memories: A Memorium to Ruth Stein in Cinema and Psychoanalysis (download syllabus)
    Sue Saperstein, MFT, PsyD

    Ruth Stein’s well-known characterization of sexuality as poignant, excessive and enigmatic (Stein, 1998) deploys terms equally applicable to cinema in its narrative, formal and emotional dimensions. It is indisputable that the greatest films are emotionally compelling, intense and mysterious and that the experience of film in general derives from these qualities, which may accompany those of screen memories and dreams. (Freud, 1899, 1900). If psychoanalytic theory helps us to understand film phenomenology, elements of film combine to generate aesthetic experience that also further enrich our psychoanalytic understanding. Not only are film narratives often vehicles for illustrating psychopathology (particularly perversion and trauma), but also editing and shot composition (dis/continuity, framing, shifts in point of view, attention to details, etc.) can render primary and secondary thought-processes transparent; while imagery powerfully depicts an inner-object world and its interdependence on the dynamics of relationships and the impact of culture.

    This course aims to develop these premises, to memorialize Ruth Stein and to familiarize students with Stein’s seminal work, with a particular focus on her theory of affects at the core of human sexuality, perversion and trauma. Classes will alternate reading NS discussing four of Stein’s papers and discussing a film (viewed in advance) including Shame, Talk to Her, and The Comfort of Strangers, selected to illuminate her works.
     

  • The Nature of "Respect" in Psychoanalytic Work (download syllabus)
    Mitchell Wilson, MD

    Imagine a patient tells you a dream in which he is joined at the hip by a Siamese twin that is sucking the vitality out of both of them. At the same time, this dream is told within a larger context in which details of the patient’s history of trauma are at play, very much in the room. As the analyst, what do you pay attention to and privilege: the dream? or do you wait and listen to how the dream is woven, or not, within this larger tapestry of trauma?

    Clinical psychoanalysis could arguably be conceptualized around this basic question: what do different schools of thought take to be that which “demands” respect. What is it, in the end, that brings a given analyst “up short,” in the presence of which this analyst says to herself: “Yes. I must pay attention to this." "I must think about this." "I must consider how to address this." Or, "I must remember this.” Also, on the other side of the question are statements like: “I can ignore this.” Or, “I can let that go. It’s of no moment.”  We all know that different schools of thought (we could also say different psychoanalytic communities) answer this question of respect in very different ways. We might think that these differences come down to how the unconscious is understood to manifest itself in the work. This is certainly true. But it is also true that concepts such as the frame/setting, safety, interpersonal negotiation, the analytic third as a joint creation, reverie, countertransference—all of these ideas or “things” (are they things?) are also, at times and for some analysts, treated as bedrock, as the final word on the matter, as worthy, in other words, of respect.

    Though I’ve couched this basic question of respect in heady language, the elective I have in mind will engage basic clinical questions and clinical approaches. We will read some classic papers that lay out particular perspectives on this question of what the analyst should pay attention to, in the end. None of these papers uses the word “respect,” but I would argue that this is what these analysts are talking about. Respect, as you might imagine, has a lot to do with ethics as well: as analysts, what is our felt obligation to our patients? So respect has something to do with reasons for why we do one thing rather than another (the basics of ethics).

    Likely readings will include:

    The Patient’s Speech (ego psychology):
    Jacob Arlow: “Stilted Listening: Psychoanalysis as Discourse.” Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 1995, pp. 215-233.
    Serge Leclaire: “On the ear with which one ought to listen.” In, Psychoanalysing: On the Order of the Unconscious and the Practice of the Letter. Stanford     University Press, 1998.

    The Countertransference/Projective Identification (neo-Kleinian):
    Michael Feldman: Projective identification: the analyst’s involvement. International Journal of Psychoanalysis, 1997, pp. 227-241.

    Independent School:
    Michael Parsons: Excerpts from, The Dove That Returns, The Dove That Vanishes: Paradox and Creativity in Psychoanalysis. Routledge, 2000.

 

Click here to download entire Year 4 Schedule in Excel format.

08:00am - 09:30am

  • Theory and Practice
    March 6, 13, 20, 27; April 10, 17, 24, 2015
    7 Sessions
    Patricia Marra, MFT

    If we think of psychoanalytic theory as formalized thinking about experience, does it belong in the consulting room?  If so, where, when, how?  This course will study the relationship between theory and practice, how the two can work for and against each other. We will examine the difference between the theory that is held onto or sought in every session, rather than the theory that is found anew with each patient in each hour.  We will look at what it means to attend to what is “unbidden” in the hour — in the form of images, thoughts, reveries, “characters in the field,” and those theories and theorists  that are part of our intuitive sense of “what is happening” in the moment.
     

  • A Return to Freud
    May 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, 2015
    5 Sessions
    MIchael Windholz, PhD

    This fourth year course will revisit the papers and ideas of the founder of psychoanalysis. In our five weeks of meetings we will chart some of his important discoveries, explore the development of his theory and discuss the implications of his findings through a close reading of some of his works.

09:45am - 11:15am

  • Perversions (download syllabus)
    September 5, 12, 19, 26; October 3, 10, 17, 24, 31, 2014
    9 Sessions
    Maria Longuemare, MD, PhD

    Perversion is a notoriously difficult concept to grasp. Its elusiveness is at the core of the clinical challenge we face in treatments where perverse dynamics dominate and often produce intense yet incomprehensible transference-countertransference experiences. In this course, we will begin by studying the development of Freud’s theories about perversion over his lifetime (a trajectory that parallels the development of the structural model within drive theory and ultimately integrates Freud’s later theory of the life and death instincts). We will then attempt to trace the subsequent evolution of our psychoanalytic understanding of perversion and the diversity of technical approaches that emerge from these different formulations. The readings are organized around different clinical understandings of perversion (all of which have roots in Freud’s thinking) -- (a) those that view perversion as a problem with sexuality due to a developmental failure to accept ‘reality’ (regression and defense models); (b) those that view perversion as a problem with aggression (and the concomitant sexualization of destructiveness); (c) those that view perversion as a survival strategy in the face of a traumatic or unloving object world. Interestingly, these different clinical formulations do not always break down along familiar theoretical lines, and there is often a great deal of convergence at the clinical surface amongst analysts of very different theoretical (metapsychological) orientations. Conversely, there is often profound disagreement in the technical approach to the same clinical picture, even amongst those who may share a theoretical understanding of the problem. Although it is necessary to become familiar with the different theoretical models in order to wade through the extensive literature on perversion, this course will have a predominantly clinical focus. Our primary goals will be: (1) to clarify, for ourselves, the differences in clinical understandings and technical approaches to perversion; and (2) to identify which orientations feel most alive and resonant in our own clinical work. Cases will be presented by the instructor, and candidates will be encouraged to bring clinical material for our discussions.
     

  • Psychoanalytic Perspectives on Trauma
    November 7, 21; December 5, 12, 19, 2014; January 9, 23, 30, 2015
    8 Sessions
    Michael Wagner, PhD, MFT and Clara Kwun, LCSW

    In this course we will explore the concept of trauma from historical and contemporary psychoanalytic perspectives.  It is the goal of the course that you come to be able to articulate for yourself three things: what is trauma; what role does trauma play in life, development, and psychopathology; and how does your understanding influence your thinking about your clinical work.
     

  • Electives*
    February 6, 13, 20, 27; March 6, 13, 20, 2015
    7 Sessions
     
  • Interdisciplinary Studies
    March 27, 2015 and April 10, 2015
    2 Sessions
     
  • Termination (download syllabus)
    April 17, 24; May 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, 2015
    7 Sessions
    Robin Deutsch, PhD

    Termination is one of the least written about phenomena in clinical practice. And yet, the reality of ending exists from the beginning.  Even the word, termination, reflexively carries a tone consistent with discontinuation and dissolution, an implication of sudden, abrupt ending. What does ending an analysis mean? What does the ending consistent of? In this course, we will read from different theoretical perspectives in order to grasp the complexity of this phase of treatment for our patients and ourselves. Clinical material from termination processes will be presented.

12:15pm - 01:45pm

  • Ethics (download syllabus)
    September 5, 12, 19, 26; October 3, 10, 17, 2014
    7 Sessions
    Paul M. Ransohoff, DMH

    This seminar will examine some basic issues in the ethics of psychoanalysis.  We will touch on analytic perspectives on morals as well as on the ethical implications of treatment and technique, but our main focus will be on psychoanalytic professional ethics.  Topics will include confidentiality, illness and impairment, and boundary violations.  Through the use of examples we will discuss how to understand and enhance our capacities for moral sensitivity and deliberation
     

  • Case Conference #1
    October 24, 31; November 7, 21; December 5, 12, 19, 2014
    7 Sessions
    James Dimon, MD
     
  • Candidates Association Meeting
    January 9, 2015
     
  • Case Conference #2
    January 23, 30; February 6, 13, 20, 27; March 6, 13, 20, 2015
    9 Sessions
    Henry Markman, MD
     
  • Interdisciplinary Studies
    March 27, 2015 and April 10, 2015
    2 Sessions
     
  • Case Conference #3
    April 17, 24; May 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, 2015
    7 Sessions
    Peter Goldberg, PhD
     
  • Child / Adult Case Conference
    October 24, 31; November 7, 21, December 5, 12, 19, 2014
    7 Sessions
    Lee Grossman, MD and Louis Roussel, PhD

    January 23, 30; February 6, 13, 20, 27; March 6, 13, 20; April 17, 24, May 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, 2015
    16 weeks
    Julie Ruskin, PhD and Ann Martini, LCSW

 

08:00am - 01:45pm (Full Day)

  • Visiting Professor
    November 14, 2014
    Virginia Ungar, MD

 

Electives*

  • An Introduction to Psychoanalytic Field Theory
    Georgine Marrott, PhD

    As the basis of our discussion we will participate as a group in a close reading of the seminal paper by Madeleine and Willy Baranger: “The Analytic Situation as a Dynamic Field.”  We will consider the implications for the analytic situation when it is configured as a dynamic, bi-personal field along with what occurs within the analytic pair when it is formulated in bi-personal terms.  We will have an opportunity to become familiar with some of the key concepts in the Barangers' work—“bastions,” “the point of urgency”, "interpretation as a mobilizer of the field" as well as with their particular construction of unconscious phantasy in the analytic pair.  Links with the field theory implicit in Bion’s work as well as with the work of contemporary analysts such as Ferro and Civitarese can also be explored.

    An important question we will consider is, how does a shift to a field theory model affect our listening and our thinking about our own experience in the analytic situation along with our patients' experience?  In other words, what might be the differences in mental attitude of both analyst and patient depending on whether  there  is a stage theory (e.g., a linear progression from a pre-oedipal to oedipal level) or a field theory conception active in the analytic situation?  These considerations can facilitate our staying close to the text as well as to our own clinical experience in the discussion.
     

  • Extreme Scenes and Screen Memories: A Memorium to Ruth Stein in Cinema and Psychoanalysis (download syllabus)
    Sue Saperstein, MFT, PsyD

    Ruth Stein’s well-known characterization of sexuality as poignant, excessive and enigmatic (Stein, 1998) deploys terms equally applicable to cinema in its narrative, formal and emotional dimensions. It is indisputable that the greatest films are emotionally compelling, intense and mysterious and that the experience of film in general derives from these qualities, which may accompany those of screen memories and dreams. (Freud, 1899, 1900). If psychoanalytic theory helps us to understand film phenomenology, elements of film combine to generate aesthetic experience that also further enrich our psychoanalytic understanding. Not only are film narratives often vehicles for illustrating psychopathology (particularly perversion and trauma), but also editing and shot composition (dis/continuity, framing, shifts in point of view, attention to details, etc.) can render primary and secondary thought-processes transparent; while imagery powerfully depicts an inner-object world and its interdependence on the dynamics of relationships and the impact of culture.

    This course aims to develop these premises, to memorialize Ruth Stein and to familiarize students with Stein’s seminal work, with a particular focus on her theory of affects at the core of human sexuality, perversion and trauma. Classes will alternate reading NS discussing four of Stein’s papers and discussing a film (viewed in advance) including Shame, Talk to Her, and The Comfort of Strangers, selected to illuminate her works.
     

  • The Nature of "Respect" in Psychoanalytic Work (download syllabus)
    Mitchell Wilson, MD

    Imagine a patient tells you a dream in which he is joined at the hip by a Siamese twin that is sucking the vitality out of both of them. At the same time, this dream is told within a larger context in which details of the patient’s history of trauma are at play, very much in the room. As the analyst, what do you pay attention to and privilege: the dream? or do you wait and listen to how the dream is woven, or not, within this larger tapestry of trauma?

    Clinical psychoanalysis could arguably be conceptualized around this basic question: what do different schools of thought take to be that which “demands” respect. What is it, in the end, that brings a given analyst “up short,” in the presence of which this analyst says to herself: “Yes. I must pay attention to this." "I must think about this." "I must consider how to address this." Or, "I must remember this.” Also, on the other side of the question are statements like: “I can ignore this.” Or, “I can let that go. It’s of no moment.”  We all know that different schools of thought (we could also say different psychoanalytic communities) answer this question of respect in very different ways. We might think that these differences come down to how the unconscious is understood to manifest itself in the work. This is certainly true. But it is also true that concepts such as the frame/setting, safety, interpersonal negotiation, the analytic third as a joint creation, reverie, countertransference—all of these ideas or “things” (are they things?) are also, at times and for some analysts, treated as bedrock, as the final word on the matter, as worthy, in other words, of respect.

    Though I’ve couched this basic question of respect in heady language, the elective I have in mind will engage basic clinical questions and clinical approaches. We will read some classic papers that lay out particular perspectives on this question of what the analyst should pay attention to, in the end. None of these papers uses the word “respect,” but I would argue that this is what these analysts are talking about. Respect, as you might imagine, has a lot to do with ethics as well: as analysts, what is our felt obligation to our patients? So respect has something to do with reasons for why we do one thing rather than another (the basics of ethics).

    Likely readings will include:

    The Patient’s Speech (ego psychology):
    Jacob Arlow: “Stilted Listening: Psychoanalysis as Discourse.” Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 1995, pp. 215-233.
    Serge Leclaire: “On the ear with which one ought to listen.” In, Psychoanalysing: On the Order of the Unconscious and the Practice of the Letter. Stanford     University Press, 1998.

    The Countertransference/Projective Identification (neo-Kleinian):
    Michael Feldman: Projective identification: the analyst’s involvement. International Journal of Psychoanalysis, 1997, pp. 227-241.

    Independent School:
    Michael Parsons: Excerpts from, The Dove That Returns, The Dove That Vanishes: Paradox and Creativity in Psychoanalysis. Routledge, 2000.

 

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