East Bay Yearlong Program 2013 - 2014

East Bay Yearlong Program 2013 - 2014

David Socholitzky, Ph.D., Chair
Diane Fuery, Ph.D., Sunny Kuegle, Psy.D., Michael Levin, Ph.D.
Susan Yamaguchi, L.C.S.W., Committee Members

 

Immersed in the Therapeutic Encounter:
Therapeutic Action, Psychic Change and Barriers to Change

This year we investigate the concept of therapeutic action—all that occurs between patient and therapist that leads to psychological change—and the barriers to change, internal and interpersonal, that inevitably arise for both parties in the therapeutic relationship.

The program will focus on differing formulations of therapeutic action with an emphasis upon specific obstacles to progress as they have been conceptualized in the theoretical literature. Our goal is to stimulate discussion of ways the therapist can recognize and work her or his way out of such potential impasses. 

The obstacles discussed include those that can be attributed to ongoing difficulties experienced by all therapists—narcissistic anxieties and defenses, the therapist’s use of theory to avoid uncomfortable emotional states—and those created by the unique interaction of  a particular therapeutic dyad—the impact of unresolved mourning upon both patient and therapist; the concepts of psychic retreat and pathological organization; and the intense “love, hate, (and) dread” (Bion) that both parties must endure in working with primitive fantasies and emotions.  We also examine the origins in early infant-parent interaction of the capacity for self-reflection and dialectical relating and the specific problems created by difficulties in this developmental period.  

Each course will combine a close focus on clinical material with exploration of theory. There will also be an eight-week case conference where cases will be discussed through the lens of the topics raised in the didactic part of the program.  Case conference Instructors will be added to the faculty as necessary to maintain the small size of these groups.

 

Date: Fridays, September 6, 2013 - May 30, 2014
Time: 12:00pm - 01:30pm
Sessions: 34 Sessions
Location: The Dream Institute's Wisdom Room
1672 University Avenue
Berkeley, CA 94703
Tuition Fees: $ 1,050.00
Reader and CME/CE credit fees are not included in the tuition
see Registration and Fees, Refund Policy, and CME/CE Credit Information for details
CME/CE: This program has been awarded a total of 51 CME/CE credits.
Class Size: This program has a maximum enrollment of 12.
To Register: Click here to register online now
Or call us at 415-563-5815 to register over the phone

 

When Mourning Is Incomplete: Incomplete Mourning and Transference/Countertransference Barriers to Change

In this course we will look at how incomplete mourning affects both the transference/ countertransference and the potential for psychic change. When mourning—for actually or psychically dead objects, past mistakes, lost opportunities, failures to thrive, or the self that isn’t or wasn’t--is incomplete, wounds cannot be metabolized, and powerful defenses that obstruct growth may seem vitally necessary for psychic safety.  Our patients may be deeply convinced of the need for these defenses, and we may become convinced of their necessity as well, possibly without even knowing it. We will consider how this dilemma can be worked with in the transference and the countertransference.  Readings will include Freud’s “Mourning and Melancholia,” John Steiner’s “The Conflict Between Mourning and Melancholia,” and The Puppetmaster of Lodz, a contemporary play about a concentration camp survivor.

Sue von Baeyer, Ph.D., Member & Faculty, SFCP, Personal & Supervising Analyst, PINC
Fridays, September 6, 13, 20, 27, 2013
This seminar has been awarded 6 CME/CE credits.

Educational Objectives:
Participants will be able to

  1. Apply fundamental psychoanalytic principles to their clinical work in order to listen for and identify incomplete mourning and its effect on patients' defenses and ability to make use of the treatment. They will also be able to identifiy the impact of incomplete mourning on their countertransference feelings and make use of their countertransference and the patient's transference to enhance the treatment process.
  2. Understand and listen for grief not only for losses of important people in patient's lives but also for past mistakes, lost opportunities and failure to achieve ceretain of one's goals.
  3. Use their new clinical skills in applying theory to work with clients from diverse cultural backgrounds and genders. They will have acquired knowledge of social, cultural and political influences and concerns that shape clinical treatment.
  4. The course will provide an opportunity to hear case examples by faculty and to present participants' own case vignettes. Theyh wil apply treatment principles related to their new theoretical and listening skills related to course material.
  5. Use skills learned to identify heuristics for making the most effective use of theory to adapt to individual clinical needs of patients representing a wide range of diagnostic categories.

 

Parent-Infant Reciprocity: Developing a Psychological Dialectic

This course looks at the role of parent-infant reciprocity in early development, its role in facilitating the organization of the infant mind and its relevance to the therapeutic endeavor.  Early reciprocal relating is critical to establishment of a separate subjective self with the capacity to experience inner and outer worlds through a psychological dialectic—to experience both oneness and separateness, for example. Clinically, these capacities can be seen in the ability to participate in emotional exchanges with the therapist.  When reciprocity is compromised, the infant’s ability to achieve both oneness and separateness is thwarted and her mind is left vulnerable also to blurred distinctions between self and other and between internal and external experience.  As adults, such people tend to manifest strong, unregulated affect, polarized relationships, and limited capacity for symbolization. In treatment, they also suffer impairment of the capacity to engage in the intersubjective interaction necessary for the development of the ‘analytic third’, essential to the achievement of self-observation and self-refection.  Readings will include works by Klein, Winnicott, Ogden, Britton and others.

Margot Beattie, Ph.D., Member, SFCP
Fridays, October 4, 11, 18, 25, 2013
This seminar has been awarded 6 CME/CE credits.

Educational Objectives:
Participant will be able to

  1. Learn about the manner in which reciprocal relating between infants and parent caretakers helps the infants organize their mental experience of the external world, in order to better understand and help patients whose psychological difficulties may stem from failures in very early experiences of attachment.
  2. Learn about and learn t listen for the specific difficulties in emotion regulation, the capacity to distinguish self from other in relationship and the capacity for symbolization that failures in early reciprocal relationship can create in order to enhance the depth and effectiveness of the treatment process.
  3. Use their new clinical skills in applying theory to work with clients from diverse cultural backgrounds and genders. They will have acquired knowledge of social, cultural and political influences and concerns that shape clinical treatment.
  4. The course will provide an opportunity to hear case examples by faculty and to present participants' own case vignettes. They will apply treatment principles related to their new theoretical and listening skills related to course material.
  5. The course will provide an opportunity to hear case examples by faculty and to present participants' own case vignettes. They will apply treatment principles related to their new theoretical and listening skills related to course material.

 

Case Conferences

David Socholitzky, Ph.D., Member, SFCP
Susan Yamaguchi, L.C.S.W., Member & Faculty, SFCP
Depending upon enrollment, additional instructors may be added.
Fridays, November 1, 8, 15, 22; December 6, 13, 2013; January 3,10, 2014
This seminar has been awarded 12 CME/CE credits.

Educational Objectives:
Participant will be able to

  1. Participants will be able to apply fundamental psychoanalytic principles to their clinical work, especially in the context of dealing with intense countertransferences relating to barriers to change, including psychic retreats and pathological organizations, thus improving patient care.
  2. they will be able to listen for and identify impasses and specific barriers to change discussed in didactic courses and make adjustments that give way to new expeiences in the clinical setting in order to enhance treatment effectiveness in difficult treatment situations.
  3. Use their new clinical skills in applying theory to work with clients from diverse cultural backgrounds and genders. They will have acquired knowledge of social, cultural and political influences and concerns that shape clinical treatment.
  4. The course will provide an opportunity to hear case examples by faculty and to present participants' own case vignettes. They will apply treatment principles related to their new theoretical and listening skills related to course material.
  5. Use skills learned to identify heuristics for making the most effective use of theory to adapt to individual clinical needs of patients representing a wide range of diagnostic categories.

 

Whom Are We Listening to and How? Therapeutic Action, Psychic Change and the Barriers to Change

This course begins with basic questions: What are we trying to do? What are we aiming at as psychoanalytic psychotherapists? Through a detailed look at a clinical example, the following issues will be discussed:  Are we listening to the patient? If so, what are we listening for? Do we listen for 'conflict', ‘affective urgency’, ‘transference reference’, etc.?  Are we listening to ourselves, to our countertransference? If so, why are we doing that? And how do we do that? Within these questions is the heart and soul of clinical psychoanalytic work. Many further questions and issues arise from these basic, orienting questions, which involve the nature of therapeutic action.  Along the way we will discuss the analyst as a site of resistance (the therapist's anxiety and defensiveness), the dual relation resistance (otherwise known as a bastion or pathological organization). How the analyst deals with his or her resistances is crucial to change processes and to barriers to change.  We will read Steiner on Psychic Retreats (narcissistic object relations and the pathological organization of the personality; Ferro on The Impasse; and two papers by the instructor: Wilson, “Nothing could be further from the truth: Lack in the analytic process” and “Desire and Responsibility: The Ethics of Countertransference Experience”.

Mitchell Wilson, M.D., Training & Supervising Analyst, Member & Faculty, SFCP
Fridays, January 17, 24; February 7, 14, 21, 2014
This seminar has been awarded 7.5 CME/CE credits.

Educational Objectives:
Participant will be able to

  1. Apply fundamental psychoanalytic principles to their clinical work thus improving patient care. They will learn about the concept of therapeutic action and through discussion develop a theoretical and practical understanding of how utilizing psychoanalytic theories and technique leads to therapeutic change in patients.
  2. Listen subtly and carefully to the way they listen to what patients say during a therapeutic hour in order to improve the depth and effectiveness of their therapeutic work. They will learn how to listen to the countertransference as a guide to the patient's current emotional state. And they will learn to notice what clinical and theoretical issues they tend to focus upon as they listen and what issues they tend to avoid or not to pay attention to.
  3. Understand that some of the barriers to change in psychotherapy and psychoanalysis stem from the therapist's own anxieties and defenses and learn to recognize these difficulties in themselves in order to enhance their therapeutic effectiveness with patients. They will also learn about specific theoretical conceptualizations of ways that patients resist change and how to work with these resistances to change to enhance their ability to help patients change during treatment.
  4. Use their new clinical skills in applying theory to work with clients from diverse cultural backgrounds and genders. They will have acquired knowledge of social, cultural and political influences and concerns that shape clinical treatment.
  5. The course will provide an opportunity to hear case examples by faculty and to present participants' own case vignettes. They will apply treatment principles related to their new theoretical and listening skills related to course material.
  6. Use skills learned to identify heuristics for making the most effective use of theory to adapt to individual clinical needs of patients representing a wide range of diagnostic categories.

 

The Anxiety of "Being Seen": Emerging from a Psychic Retreat

This course will explore the particular vulnerabilities that both patient and therapist experience in the face of psychic change that may represent the patient’s emergence from a previous position of psychic retreat.   The responses of both parties to this challenge can facilitate and consolidate psychic change or on the other hand, lead once again to a retreat or to a negative therapeutic reaction.  One focus of our discussion will be upon the therapist’s sensitivity at these moments to the patient's hard-to-bear feelings of embarrassment, shame or humiliation which can surface when she or he is seen by the other or when one sees and experiences oneself authentically.   This situation will also be explored in the context of the particular transference-countertransference matrix that can arise at these moments of the patient's emergence from a retreat.  Readings will be assigned John Steiner's (2011) book, "Seeing and Being Seen.”

Georgine Marrott, Ph.D., Training & Supervising Analyst, Member & Faculty, SFCP; Personal & Supervising Analyst, PINC
Fridays, February 28; March 7, 14, 21, 28, 2014
This seminar has been awarded 7.5 CME/CE credits.

Educational Objectives:
Participant will be able to

  1. Apply fundamental psychoanalytic principles to enhance the effectiveness of their clinical work by learning to understand the concept of the psychic retreat and to use the concept to recognize when a patient might be using a psychic retreat to avoid certain anxieties thaat have arisen in their experience of the therapeutic relationship.
  2. In order to improve their clinical skills learn to recognize patients' difficulties in giving up the safety of a psychic retreat in the interests of psychic change and how to help patients experience and understand less defended states without retreating from them.
  3. Leearn to recognize how they my, without knowing, identify with patients' fears of emerging from a psychic retreat in order to enhance their clinical skills so that they may help patients consolidate changes they have made without having to retreat from the therapeutic encounter bedcause of old anxieties and fears.
  4. Use their new clinical skills in applying theory to work with clients from diverse cultural backgrounds and genders. They will have acquired knowledge of social, cultural and political influences and concerns that shape clinical treatment.
  5. The course will provide an opportunity to hear case examples by faculty and to present participants' own case vignettes. They will apply treatment principles related to their new theoretical and listening skills related to course material.
  6. Use skills learned to identify heuristics for making the most effective use of theory to adapt to individual clinical needs of patients representing a wide range of diagnostic categories.

 

On Listening: to Poetry, to Patients, to Ourselves

In this course we will read poems to enhance our awareness of what is involved in listening well and what contributes to our failures to do so. Such failures in the clinical situation include excessive or premature interpretation and a defensive clinging to theory so as not to have to tolerate uncomfortable emotional states in ourselves and in our patients. Since the therapist's ability to listen without needing too quickly to interpret or "know" is essential to clinical work, experience with listening in this way to poems--deferring attempts at analysis or explanation until the poem has fully worked on us and only then considering how it did -- can show us what in our ways of listening to patients can interfere and how.  We will look at some clinical material also to illustrate listening that is open and receptive  and that which instead forecloses meanings and narrows experiences within the therapeutic relationship.  We will focus on reading poems the instructor will provide in class but other readings to be assigned or recommended  may include Freud's "The Antithetical Meanings of Primary Words," Ella Freeman  Sharpe's chapter  "On Metaphor," Loewald's  "Primary Process, Secondary Process, and  Language," and some  passages on listening from Marian Milner.

Susan Kolodny, D.M.H., Member & Faculty, SFCP; Personal Analyst, PINC; She is the author of the poetry collection, After the Firestorm
Fridays, April 4, 11, 18, 25, 2014
This seminar has been awarded 6 CME/CE credits.

Educational Objectives:
Participant will be able to

  1. Apply fundamental psychoanalytic concepts with the goal of enhancing their therapeutic effectiveness to the task of learning to listen to patients in the way poets listen to poetry. They will learn to work at listening without preconception and without premature attempts to "know" the meaning of subtle and emotionally complex communications in poetry and from patients.
  2. Learn through the experience of listening to poetry to enhance their ability to listen to patients and expand their therapeutic effectiveness. Through experiential exercises they will understand and learn how to begin to "let a listening experience fully work on them," before attempting to grasp its emotional meaning, which is a prerequisite for understanding a patient's communication, thereby enabling them to deepen their ability to understand conscious and unconscious communication in psychoanalytic psychotherapy.
  3. Improve and enhance their therapeutic listening skills by learning to observe they way they listen to patients as well as to themselves. They will be helped to develop methods of clearing away obstacles to their own effective listening in an ongoing way and improve their therapeutic effectiveness.
  4. Use their new clinical skills in applying theory to work with clients from diverse cultural backgrounds and genders. They will have acquired knowledge of social, cultural and political influences and concerns that shape clinical treatment.
  5. The course will provide an opportunity to hear case examples by faculty and to present participants' own case vignettes. They will apply treatment principles related to their new theoretical and listening skills related to course material.
  6. Use skills learned to identify heuristics for making the most effective use of theory to adapt to individual clinical needs of patients representing a wide range of diagnostic categories.

 

Psychic Change: Openings and Barriers, Preludes and Elegies

“the analytic situation itself…the psychoanalytic…task…are bound to stimulate primitive and basic feelings in analyst and analysand…love, hate, dread are sharpened to a point where the participating pair may feel them to be almost unbearable.”  
Wilfred Bion, Attention and Interpretation, 1970  

“I know too – without statistics – that Schubert’s being played in some room there and for someone the tones at the moment are more real than everything else.” 
Tomas Tranströmer, Truth Barriers, 1978 
              
Through a close reading of analytic writers Bion, Ogden, and Civitarese, and the poems of poet Tomas Tranströmer, we will enter the analytic field where basic and essential primitive forms of knowledge await discovery and communication. We will follow the ways that the fundamental search for truth creates openings and barriers to emotional growth, how a disturbance in the field may be the birth of a “foetal” idea that can resist the analyst’s and analysand’s dogma and certitude –can live, grow, and become transformational or, as Bion warns, can kill itself or be killed.

Jeanne Harasemovitch, L.C.S.W.Member & Faculty, SFCP; Lecturer, PINC, Oregon Psychoanalytic Center
Fridays, May 2, 9, 16, 30, 2014 (no class on May 23)
This seminar has been awarded 6 CME/CE credits.

Educational Objectives:
Participant will be able to

  1. Apply fundamental psychoanalytic principles to enhance their clinical effectiveness by developing a theoretical understanding of primitive anxieties and the ability to know when patients might be experiencing them in order to improve their sensitivity to such anxieties and recognize them during their clinical work.
  2. In order to learn how to work productively with patients experiencing primitive anxieties, learn how to recognize that these anxieties may be communicated by patients in such a way that both patient and therapist may experience intense feelings of "anxiety, love and dread". They will learn how to manage those feelings within oneself in order that they not obstruct their ability both to recognize them in themselves and in patients in order to enhance their capacity to work productively with primitive anxieties stemming from the kinds of failures in infant-parent relating which are discussed in an earlier course in this yearlong program: "Parent- Infant Reciprocity: Developing A Psychological Dialectic" entitled:
  3. In order to enhance their clinical skills with patients suffering from primitive anxieties, understand the theory underlying the possibility that if such anxieties can be allowed to flourish without premature interpretation by the analyst, the joint attempt to understand them can lead to their successful resolution.
  4. Use their new clinical skills in applying theory to work with clients from diverse cultural backgrounds and genders. They will have acquired knowledge of social, cultural and political influences and concerns that shape clinical treatment.
  5. The course will provide an opportunity to hear case examples by faculty and to present participants' own case vignettes. They will apply treatment principles related to their new theoretical and listening skills related to course material.
  6. Use skills learned to identify heuristics for making the most effective use of theory to adapt to individual clinical needs of patients representing a wide range of diagnostic categories.

Eligibility

This program is designed for psychotherapists seeking further education in psychoanalytic psychotherapy. Registration is for a seminar series not combined with a continuous case conference or for an individual course. Participants in treatment with one of the instructors should inquire about the opportunity to take a comparable course in one of the other programs.

If you have any questions about your level of preparation, please contact either of the East Bay Extension Division Yearlong Chair: David Socholitzky, Ph.D., at 510-548-3913.

* A small number of participants with academic or artistic backgrounds may apply to the seminar series with permission of the Chair of the SFCP Extension Division. The Chair will consider these applications case-by-case and offer participation as space allows. In addition, anyone participating must meet with the Chair to discuss confidentiality rules concerning clinical material and sign an agreement to uphold confidentiality.

 

Registration

 

Course Tuition Fee and Refund Policy

Fee is $ 1,050.00; 34 sessions; cost of readers and CME/CE credits fees are not included in tuition. Full payment is due upon registration.  In addition, a two-installment plan is available for this program.  Click here to learn more about the installment plan option.

 

Discounted Fee

Only one of the following discounts can be used for each registration:

  • Community Members may deduct 10% from the registration fees.
  • Students may deduct 25% from the registration fees with student ID provided at the time of registration.

 

Readers Fee

Charges for reading material required for the seminars are not included in tuition. They are based upon copyright laws and change based on the content of the readers. The charges will be billed to you separately. Please submit your registration and your tuition payment two weeks in advance in order to receive reading materials before the course starting date.

 

CME/CE Credit Fee

This program has been awarded a total of 51 CME/CE credits. The credits cost per hour is $10 for all SFCP members, and $12 for non SFCP members. SFCP has established a cap cost of $200 for credits requested per program. The cost of CME/CE credits is separate from the programs fees and billed individually upon the request for credits at the end of the seminar.

 

CME/CE Attendance Requirements

  • Physicians, Social Workers, Marriage and Family Therapists, and Registered Nurses will be awarded AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ on an hour for hour basis; see the program description for the maximum of credits awarded for each program.
  • Psychologists participating in long-term programs (lecture series) who can demonstrate a minimum of 80% attendance for a seminar within the series, are eligible to obtain these credits by notifying the SFCP office after the seminar has ended. Seminars of 4 sessions or fewer require 100% attendance. Participants will pay the appropriate fee for the seminar (based on the number of credits they obtain), and then will receive a verification letter of their attendance.
  • 100% attendance is required for short-term programs (individual course).

 

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