San Francisco Yearlong Program 2013 - 2014

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San Francisco Yearlong Program 2013 - 2014

Meryl Botkin and Patricia Marra, Co-Chairs
Israel Katz, Catherine Mallouh, Sue von Baeyer, Catherine Witzling,
Committee Members

“No Exit”:  Working with Pathological Organizations

Slaves and tyrants. Hostages and hooligans. Starved and starving.  Such are the demographics of the inner worlds of those taking sanctuary from psychic pain in tenacious pathological defensive organizations. As clinicians, how can we interrupt such a state of affairs?  These inner worlds are among the biggest challenge to psychoanalytic intervention.  This yearlong program offers many ways to think about and influence such intransigent states of minds.  We begin with the history of the concept of pathological organizations, as it exists under many names, and then focus on a panoply of intervening techniques, including working closely with the transference. Then we explore how eating disorders tenaciously attempt to defy the body to maintain organized phantasies of incorporation, no-entry, and domination.  We also look into unusual modes of pathological organizations, including those involving cynicism, lying, doubt, and those based on extreme stasis through an inner world filled with emptiness.  We then look at the role of guilt and the failure to mourn as a prime shaper of pathological organizations. Lastly, we explore the phenomena of psychic retreats and what leads one to emerge from them.

Date: Fridays, September 6, 2013 - June 6, 2014
Time: 12:00pm - 01:30pm Didactic Seminar
01:45pm - 03:00pm Continuous Case Conference
Sessions: 37 Sessions
Location: San Francisco Center for Psychoanalysis
444 Natoma Street
San Francisco, CA 94103
Tuition Fees: $ 1,850.00
Reader and CME/CE credit fees are not included in the tuition
see Registration and Fees, Refund Policy, and CME/CE Credit Information for details
CME/CE: This program has been awarded a total of 100.5 CME/CE credits.
Class Size: minimum enrollment of 8, maximum enrollment of 16
To Register: Click here to register online now
Or call us at 415-563-5815 to register over the phone

 

The Concept of “Pathological Organization”

In this course, we will study the concept of a defensive structure, which the Neo-Kleinians called the “pathological organization.”  We will trace the history of its development, following its description by various psychoanalysts under diverse terms:  Karl Abraham’s  “negative narcissism,” Herbert Rosenfeld’s “pathological narcissism” and later “destructive narcissism,” André Green’s “negative narcissism,” Wilfred Bion’s “ego-destructive superego,” Hanna Segal and Edna O’Shaughnessy’s “defensive organization,” John Steiner’s “psychic retreat,” and Donald Meltzer’s “claustrum.”  We will examine the usefulness and clinical relevance of the concept within the context of clinical examples.

Dr. Helen Schoenhals HartMember & Faculty, SFCP
Fridays, September 6, 13, 20, 27, 2013
This seminar has been awarded 6 CME/CE credits.

Dr. Helen Schoenhals Hart is a Member and Faculty of SFCP.  She trained at the Sigmund Freud-Institut in Frankfurt, a component member of the DPV (German Psychoanalytic Association) and the IPA. She worked abroad as an analyst for over 30 years, at the same time pursuing postgraduate training with London Kleinians.  She has been a training analyst of the German Psychoanalytic Association since 1994.  In 2008 she moved her practice to San Rafael, California.

Educational Objectives

Participants will be able to

  1. Trace the concept of pathological organizations through the readings of different theorists, it’s usefulness and relevance in clinical practice.
  2. Compare the different theories underlying the concept of pathological organizations and how pathological organizations manifest clinically across diverse phenomena such as eating disorders, lying, cynicism, doubt, dogmatism, unbearable guilt and extreme states of emptiness.
  3. Describe the different technical interventions and approaches used with patients with pathological organizations.
  4. Distinguish between the different technical approaches and learn the ways of reaching patients with pathological organizations with diverse phenomena.
  5. Discuss the transference counter-transference experience in encountering pathological organizations in working with patients.
  6. Utilize the concept of psychic retreats as a system of defense and protection against unbearable anxiety in pathological organizations.

 

Treating Pathological Organizations: Comparing Technical Approaches 

Treating patients in whom "pathological organizations" play a central role can be extremely difficult and confusing, and, yet, we commonly find ourselves encountering these patients. This class will look at different technical approaches through comparing several key theorists. We will begin with Rosenfeld’s and other early Kleinian's ideas about the importance of integrating the destructive aspects of the pathological organization.  We will touch on Meltzer's ideas about the need to find, make contact with, and "rescue" the libidinal/dependent part of the person from
within the pathological organization.  We will study Steiner's ideas about the need to understand and interpret pathological organizations as a defense against both the paranoid schizoid and depressive positions.  Lastly, we will look at Paul Williams' unique technical approach that involves "triangulating" and helping the "non-psychotic" part of the person separate from the pathological organization.  We will make liberal use of the instructor's and students' clinical material to further our digestion of these ideas and to consider more deeply the implications for technique. 

Beth Steinberg, Ph.D., Member & Faculty, SFCP
Fridays, October 4, 11, 18, 25; November 1, 8, 2013
This seminar has been awarded 9 CME/CE credits.

Beth Steinberg, Ph.D., is a Member and Faculty of SFCP.  She is also SFCP’s Chair of the Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy Education Division and the Outreach Chair of the San Francisco Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy Training Program.  She teaches at SFCP, at Access Institute, and CPMC, RAMs and also runs private study groups.  She is the Former Chief Psychologist at Boyer House.  She has an office in San Francisco, where she practices psychoanalysis and consultation.

Educational Objectives

Participants will be able to

  1. Trace the concept of pathological organizations through the readings of different theorists, it’s usefulness and relevance in clinical practice.
  2. Compare the different theories underlying the concept of pathological organizations and how pathological organizations manifest clinically across diverse phenomena such as eating disorders, lying, cynicism, doubt, dogmatism, unbearable guilt and extreme states of emptiness.
  3. Describe the different technical interventions and approaches used with patients with pathological organizations.
  4. Distinguish between the different technical approaches and learn the ways of reaching patients with pathological organizations with diverse phenomena.
  5. Discuss the transference counter-transference experience in encountering pathological organizations in working with patients.
  6. Utilize the concept of psychic retreats as a system of defense and protection against unbearable anxiety in pathological organizations.

 

Working with Transference in Pathological Organizations

When our patients are under the sway of a pathological organization, the part of the personality that we need to reach in our therapeutic work can be inaccessible. Instead of interacting with a worried, needy or concerned patient, we encounter an arrogant, destructive or false patient who thwarts our therapeutic efforts. These patients use words to act upon us. When we attend to the pressures and tensions in our relationship with the patient, we can begin to articulate the activities of aspects of the pathological organization, gaining entrance into the inner world of our patients.  We will read papers by analytic thinkers who have experienced and constructively addressed these organizations, such as Joseph, Bird, Alvarez, Hoffman, Britton, Rosenfeld, and Brenman.

Holly Gordon, D.M.H., Member & Faculty, SFCP
Fridays, November 15, 22; December 6, 13, 2013
This seminar has been awarded 6 CME/CE credits.

Holly Gordon, D.M.H., is a Member and Faculty of SFCP. She has taught a variety of courses at SFCP, CPMC, and UCSF-LPPI. She received the American Psychoanalytic Association Edith Sabshin award for excellence in teaching. She is an analyst in private practice in San Francisco seeing adults, adolescents and couples.

Educational Objectives

Participants will be able to

  1. Trace the concept of pathological organizations through the readings of different theorists, it’s usefulness and relevance in clinical practice.
  2. Compare the different theories underlying the concept of pathological organizations and how pathological organizations manifest clinically across diverse phenomena such as eating disorders, lying, cynicism, doubt, dogmatism, unbearable guilt and extreme states of emptiness.
  3. Describe the different technical interventions and approaches used with patients with pathological organizations.
  4. Distinguish between the different technical approaches and learn the ways of reaching patients with pathological organizations with diverse phenomena.
  5. Discuss the transference counter-transference experience in encountering pathological organizations in working with patients.
  6. Utilize the concept of psychic retreats as a system of defense and protection against unbearable anxiety in pathological organizations.

 

Illusions of Safety:  Eating Disorders and their Treatment

Eating disordered patients are among the most difficult to treat. They urgently want to maintain their bingeing or restricting symptoms, despite the damage to their bodies, lives, and psychic growth.  In this course we will examine the dynamics underlying the illusory safety of eating disorders. We will consider various organized phantasies of eating disordered patients: as unconsciously eating the mother, as a ‘no-entry’ rejection of feeding or psychic nourishment subsequent to excessive parental projection, as narcissistic organizations used to dominate or merge with the object. We will examine anorexia and bulimia through clinical information and papers by Henry Rey, Gianna Williams, Emanuella Quagliata and myself.

Mary Brady, Ph.D.Member & Faculty, SFCP
Fridays, January 3, 10, 17, 24, 2014
This seminar has been awarded 6 CME/CE credits.

Mary Brady, Ph.D., is a Member and Faculty of SFCP.  She recently co-authored with Tyminski  and Carey “To know or not to know: An application of Bion’s K and –K to child treatment,” in the Journal of Child Psychotherapy, 2012.  In 2010 she won APsaA’s Ralph Roughton Award for her paper: “‘Sometimes we are prejudiced against ourselves’: Internalized homophobia and coming out in an adolescent boy,” published in Contemporary Psychoanalysis, 2011. She co-leads a group on treating adolescents and young adults, and teaches on a variety of topics. She is an adult, adolescent, and child psychoanalyst in San Francisco.

Educational Objectives

Participants will be able to

  1. Trace the concept of pathological organizations through the readings of different theorists, it’s usefulness and relevance in clinical practice.
  2. Compare the different theories underlying the concept of pathological organizations and how pathological organizations manifest clinically across diverse phenomena such as eating disorders, lying, cynicism, doubt, dogmatism, unbearable guilt and extreme states of emptiness.
  3. Describe the different technical interventions and approaches used with patients with pathological organizations.
  4. Distinguish between the different technical approaches and learn the ways of reaching patients with pathological organizations with diverse phenomena.
  5. Discuss the transference counter-transference experience in encountering pathological organizations in working with patients.
  6. Utilize the concept of psychic retreats as a system of defense and protection against unbearable anxiety in pathological organizations.

 

Under the Radar:  Unusual Modes of Psychic Retreat

Psychoanalytic therapists are most keenly aware of pathological organizations when they differ sufficiently from what is culturally normative. Often, however, such emotional constellations are “quiet” enough to escape clinical attention. In this seminar, we will read selections from Christopher Bollas, Donald Meltzer, Adam Phillips, and Carlo Strenger, who all have turned their attention to the more subtle modes of psychic retreat involving cynicism, dogmatism, lying, exaggerated certainty and doubt, the pursuit of fame, the idealization of normality, and fixation on “what might have been.” Within the context of clinical material, we will explore how to identify, talk about, and help our patients evolve beyond such constrained states of mind.

Lee Rather, Ph.D., Member & Faculty, SFCP
Fridays, January 31; February 7, 14, 21, 28; March 7, 2014
This seminar has been awarded 9 CME/CE credits.

Lee Rather, Ph.D., is a Member and Faculty of SFCP and Personal and Supervising Analyst of PINC.  Dr. Rather has published papers in the International Journal of Psychoanalysis, Psychoanalytic Psychology, and fort da on topics including the working alliance, primal scene phantasy, integration of maternal and paternal function, the existential dynamics of mourning, and the unconscious aspects of creativity in the arts. His most recent paper, “Love and Its Subversions in Giuseppe Verdi’s Operas Otello and Aida,” was recently published in fort da.  Dr Rather is in private practice in San Francisco.

Educational Objectives

Participants will be able to

  1. Trace the concept of pathological organizations through the readings of different theorists, it’s usefulness and relevance in clinical practice.
  2. Compare the different theories underlying the concept of pathological organizations and how pathological organizations manifest clinically across diverse phenomena such as eating disorders, lying, cynicism, doubt, dogmatism, unbearable guilt and extreme states of emptiness.
  3. Describe the different technical interventions and approaches used with patients with pathological organizations.
  4. Distinguish between the different technical approaches and learn the ways of reaching patients with pathological organizations with diverse phenomena.
  5. Discuss the transference counter-transference experience in encountering pathological organizations in working with patients.
  6. Utilize the concept of psychic retreats as a system of defense and protection against unbearable anxiety in pathological organizations.

 

Avatars of the Clinic of Emptiness

As-if personality, false self, "ordinary" psychosis, the work of the negative — words and concepts that try to capture the challenge of working with people who present with a strong sense of emptiness, of falseness, of impending doom and agony, of nothingness and non-existence that threaten to become infinite. The constitutional lack that, under better circumstances, could be transmitted by parents and society and lead to representation, desire and the social bond, went out the window or was not there to begin with.  We will examine this clinic of emptiness, its challenges in our clinical work, and the controversies it has generated and continues to generate in terms of the applicability of the analytic method. We will supplement readings from Deutsch, Winnicott, Lacan, Green, and Recalcati with clinical discussion.

Israel Katz, M.D.Member & Faculty, SFCP
Fridays, March 14, 21, 28; April 4, 11, 2014
This seminar has been awarded 7.5 CME/CE credits.

Israel Katz, M.D., is a Member of SFCP. He has a strong interest in cross-cultural issues and the engagement of psychoanalysis with contemporary clinical challenges.  He is past-Editor of IPSO, the organization for candidates in formation at IPA-affiliated Institutes and Societies. He is a psychoanalyst and psychiatrist with a private practice in San Francisco working with adults.

Educational Objectives

Participants will be able to

  1. Trace the concept of pathological organizations through the readings of different theorists, it’s usefulness and relevance in clinical practice.
  2. Compare the different theories underlying the concept of pathological organizations and how pathological organizations manifest clinically across diverse phenomena such as eating disorders, lying, cynicism, doubt, dogmatism, unbearable guilt and extreme states of emptiness.
  3. Describe the different technical interventions and approaches used with patients with pathological organizations.
  4. Distinguish between the different technical approaches and learn the ways of reaching patients with pathological organizations with diverse phenomena.
  5. Discuss the transference counter-transference experience in encountering pathological organizations in working with patients.
  6. Utilize the concept of psychic retreats as a system of defense and protection against unbearable anxiety in pathological organizations.

 

Pathological Organization and Protective Retreat:  Unbearable guilt and the inability to mourn

Within the context of pathological organizations of the personality, this course focuses on the relationship between unbearable guilt and the inability to mourn.  We will consider how pathological organizations serve as a source of unbearable guilt, and as a protective retreat from this guilt.  We will discuss how to help patients make contact with their guilt about the state of their damaged objects, and to create a mental space where mourning is possible.

Margo Chapin, M.F.T.Member & Faculty, SFCP
Fridays, April 18, 25; May 2, 9, 2014
This seminar has been awarded 6 CME/CE credits.

Margo Chapin, M.F.T., is a Member and Faculty of SFCP. She teaches throughout the Bay Area, most currently on the clinical relevance of the primal scene and oedipal phantasy, primitive mental states, addictive states of mind, and the use of unconscious phantasy, transference and counter-transference in clinical work. She also leads private training and consultation groups with a focus on Kleinian, Neo-Kleinian, and Bionian theory and therapeutic technique. She has a private practice in Oakland where she provides psychoanalysis and consultation.

Educational Objectives

Participants will be able to

  1. Trace the concept of pathological organizations through the readings of different theorists, it’s usefulness and relevance in clinical practice.
  2. Compare the different theories underlying the concept of pathological organizations and how pathological organizations manifest clinically across diverse phenomena such as eating disorders, lying, cynicism, doubt, dogmatism, unbearable guilt and extreme states of emptiness.
  3. Describe the different technical interventions and approaches used with patients with pathological organizations.
  4. Distinguish between the different technical approaches and learn the ways of reaching patients with pathological organizations with diverse phenomena.
  5. Discuss the transference counter-transference experience in encountering pathological organizations in working with patients.
  6. Utilize the concept of psychic retreats as a system of defense and protection against unbearable anxiety in pathological organizations.

 

Entering and Emerging from Psychic Retreats

This class will be an opportunity to reflect on and discuss John Steiner’s evolving thinking on pathological organizations and his idea of psychic retreat as a protection against intolerable anxiety and psychic reality.  In his book, Psychic Retreats, he describes the system of defensive structures that manifests clinically as stuckness and lack of real contact.  In his second book, Seeing and Being Seen: Emerging from a Psychic Retreat, he describes the difficulties of and the possibilities for growth in emerging from the pathologic organization.  With a focus on both theory and in-depth clinical descriptions, we will study selected chapters from each book.

Catherine Mallouh, M.D.
Fridays, May 16, 23, 30; June 6, 2014
This seminar has been awarded 6 CME/CE credits.

Dr. Catherine Mallouh's bio will be available shortly

Educational Objectives

Participants will be able to

  1. Trace the concept of pathological organizations through the readings of different theorists, it’s usefulness and relevance in clinical practice.
  2. Compare the different theories underlying the concept of pathological organizations and how pathological organizations manifest clinically across diverse phenomena such as eating disorders, lying, cynicism, doubt, dogmatism, unbearable guilt and extreme states of emptiness.
  3. Describe the different technical interventions and approaches used with patients with pathological organizations.
  4. Distinguish between the different technical approaches and learn the ways of reaching patients with pathological organizations with diverse phenomena.
  5. Discuss the transference counter-transference experience in encountering pathological organizations in working with patients.
  6. Utilize the concept of psychic retreats as a system of defense and protection against unbearable anxiety in pathological organizations.

 

Continuous Case Conferences

Patricia Marra, M.F.T.Member & Faculty, SFCP
Fridays, September 6, 13, 20, 27; October 4, 11, 2013
This seminar has been awarded 7.5 CME/CE credits.

Patricia Marra, M.F.T., is a Member and Faculty of SFCP.  She has taught several courses for SFCP, with a focus on Bion’s container/contained, the analytic field, and Italian psychoanalysis.  She is also the Book & Film Review Editor of NCSPP’s journal, fort da. She maintains a private practice in San Francisco.

Educational Objectives

Participants will be able to

  1. Trace the concept of pathological organizations through the readings of different theorists, it’s usefulness and relevance in clinical practice.
  2. Compare the different theories underlying the concept of pathological organizations and how pathological organizations manifest clinically across diverse phenomena such as eating disorders, lying, cynicism, doubt, dogmatism, unbearable guilt and extreme states of emptiness.
  3. Describe the different technical interventions and approaches used with patients with pathological organizations.
  4. Distinguish between the different technical approaches and learn the ways of reaching patients with pathological organizations with diverse phenomena.
  5. Discuss the transference counter-transference experience in encountering pathological organizations in working with patients.
  6. Utilize the concept of psychic retreats as a system of defense and protection against unbearable anxiety in pathological organizations.

 

Continuous Case Conferences

Meryl Botkin, Ph.D.Member & Faculty, SFCP
Abbot Bronstein, Ph.D.
Fridays, October 18, 25; November 1, 8, 15, 22, 2013
This seminar has been awarded 7.5 CME/CE credits.

Meryl  Botkin, Ph.D., is a Member and Faculty of SFCP.  She received her undergraduate and graduate degrees from UC Berkeley and trained at Stanford’s Children’s Hospital.  Dr. Botkin is an Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at UCSF, and has taught several courses at CPMC and SFCP.  She maintains a private practice in San Francisco.

Dr. Abbot Bronstein's bio will be available shortly

Educational Objectives

Participants will be able to

  1. Trace the concept of pathological organizations through the readings of different theorists, it’s usefulness and relevance in clinical practice.
  2. Compare the different theories underlying the concept of pathological organizations and how pathological organizations manifest clinically across diverse phenomena such as eating disorders, lying, cynicism, doubt, dogmatism, unbearable guilt and extreme states of emptiness.
  3. Describe the different technical interventions and approaches used with patients with pathological organizations.
  4. Distinguish between the different technical approaches and learn the ways of reaching patients with pathological organizations with diverse phenomena.
  5. Discuss the transference counter-transference experience in encountering pathological organizations in working with patients.
  6. Utilize the concept of psychic retreats as a system of defense and protection against unbearable anxiety in pathological organizations.

 

Continuous Case Conferences

Eric Glassgold, M.D.
Fridays, December 6, 13, 2013; January 3, 10, 17, 24, 2014
This seminar has been awarded 7.5 CME/CE credits.

Dr. Eric Glassgold's bio will be available shortly

Educational Objectives

Participants will be able to

  1. Trace the concept of pathological organizations through the readings of different theorists, it’s usefulness and relevance in clinical practice.
  2. Compare the different theories underlying the concept of pathological organizations and how pathological organizations manifest clinically across diverse phenomena such as eating disorders, lying, cynicism, doubt, dogmatism, unbearable guilt and extreme states of emptiness.
  3. Describe the different technical interventions and approaches used with patients with pathological organizations.
  4. Distinguish between the different technical approaches and learn the ways of reaching patients with pathological organizations with diverse phenomena.
  5. Discuss the transference counter-transference experience in encountering pathological organizations in working with patients.
  6. Utilize the concept of psychic retreats as a system of defense and protection against unbearable anxiety in pathological organizations.

 

Continuous Case Conferences

Katherine MacVicar, M.D.
Fridays, January 31; February 7, 14, 21, 28; March 7, 2014
This seminar has been awarded 7.5 CME/CE credits.

Dr. Katherine MacVicar's bio will be available shortly

Educational Objectives

Participants will be able to

  1. Trace the concept of pathological organizations through the readings of different theorists, it’s usefulness and relevance in clinical practice.
  2. Compare the different theories underlying the concept of pathological organizations and how pathological organizations manifest clinically across diverse phenomena such as eating disorders, lying, cynicism, doubt, dogmatism, unbearable guilt and extreme states of emptiness.
  3. Describe the different technical interventions and approaches used with patients with pathological organizations.
  4. Distinguish between the different technical approaches and learn the ways of reaching patients with pathological organizations with diverse phenomena.
  5. Discuss the transference counter-transference experience in encountering pathological organizations in working with patients.
  6. Utilize the concept of psychic retreats as a system of defense and protection against unbearable anxiety in pathological organizations.

 

Continuous Case Conferences

Sue von Baeyer, Ph.D.
Mary Ewert, D.M.H.
Fridays, March 14, 21, 28; April 4, 11, 18, 2014
This seminar has been awarded 7.5 CME/CE credits.

Sue von Baeyer, Ph.D.,  is a Member and Faculty at SFCP and Personal and Supervising Analyst at PINC.  She is the former Director of Training, The Boyer House Foundation.  She maintains a private practice of psychoanalysis and psychotherapy in Berkeley.

Dr. Mary Ewert's bio will be available shortly

Educational Objectives

Participants will be able to

  1. Trace the concept of pathological organizations through the readings of different theorists, it’s usefulness and relevance in clinical practice.
  2. Compare the different theories underlying the concept of pathological organizations and how pathological organizations manifest clinically across diverse phenomena such as eating disorders, lying, cynicism, doubt, dogmatism, unbearable guilt and extreme states of emptiness.
  3. Describe the different technical interventions and approaches used with patients with pathological organizations.
  4. Distinguish between the different technical approaches and learn the ways of reaching patients with pathological organizations with diverse phenomena.
  5. Discuss the transference counter-transference experience in encountering pathological organizations in working with patients.
  6. Utilize the concept of psychic retreats as a system of defense and protection against unbearable anxiety in pathological organizations.

 

Continuous Case Conferences

Georgine Marrott, Ph.D.
Fridays, April 25; May 2, 9, 16, 23, 30, 2014
This seminar has been awarded 7.5 CME/CE credits.

Dr. Georgine Marrott's bio will be available shortly

Educational Objectives

Participants will be able to

  1. Trace the concept of pathological organizations through the readings of different theorists, it’s usefulness and relevance in clinical practice.
  2. Compare the different theories underlying the concept of pathological organizations and how pathological organizations manifest clinically across diverse phenomena such as eating disorders, lying, cynicism, doubt, dogmatism, unbearable guilt and extreme states of emptiness.
  3. Describe the different technical interventions and approaches used with patients with pathological organizations.
  4. Distinguish between the different technical approaches and learn the ways of reaching patients with pathological organizations with diverse phenomena.
  5. Discuss the transference counter-transference experience in encountering pathological organizations in working with patients.
  6. Utilize the concept of psychic retreats as a system of defense and protection against unbearable anxiety in pathological organizations.

Eligibility

This program is designed for psychotherapists seeking further education in psychoanalytic psychotherapy. Registration is for a seminar series combined with a continuous case conference. Participants in treatment with one of the instructors should inquire about the opportunity to take a comparable course in one of the other programs.

If you have any questions about your level of preparation, please contact either of the San Francisco Extension Division Yearlong Co-Chairs: Meryl Botkin, Ph.D., at 415-922-8966, or Patricia Marra, M.F.T., at 415-668-0767.

* A small number of participants with academic or artistic backgrounds may apply to the seminar series with permission of the Chair of the SFCP Extension Division. The Chair will consider these applications case-by-case and offer participation as space allows. In addition, anyone participating must meet with the Chair to discuss confidentiality rules concerning clinical material and sign an agreement to uphold confidentiality.

 

Registration

 

Course Tuition Fee and Refund Policy

Fee is $ 1,850.00; 37 sessions; cost of readers and CME/CE credits fees are not included in tuition.  Full payment is due upon registration.  In addition, a two-installment plan and a ten-installment plan are available for this program.  Click here to learn more about the installment plans option.

 

Discounted Fee

Only one of the following discounts can be used for each registration:

  • Community Members may deduct 10% from the registration fees.
  • Students may deduct 25% from the registration fees with student ID provided at the time of registration.

 

Readers Fee

Charges for reading material required for the seminars are not included in tuition. They are based upon copyright laws and change based on the content of the readers. The charges will be billed to you separately. Please submit your registration and your tuition payment two weeks in advance in order to receive reading materials before the course starting date.

 

CME/CE Credit Fee

This program has been awarded a total of 100.5 CME/CE credits. The credits cost per hour is $10 for all SFCP members, and $12 for non SFCP members. SFCP has established a cap cost of $200 for credits requested per program. The cost of CME/CE credits is separate from the programs fees and billed individually upon the request for credits at the end of the seminar.

 

CME/CE Attendance Requirements

  • Physicians, Social Workers, Marriage and Family Therapists, and Registered Nurses will be awarded AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ on an hour for hour basis; see the program description for the maximum of credits awarded for each program.
  • Psychologists participating in long-term programs (lecture series) who can demonstrate a minimum of 80% attendance for a seminar within the series, are eligible to obtain these credits by notifying the SFCP office after the seminar has ended. Seminars of 4 sessions or fewer require 100% attendance. Participants will pay the appropriate fee for the seminar (based on the number of credits they obtain), and then will receive a verification letter of their attendance.
  • 100% attendance is required for short-term programs (individual course).

 

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