2018 - 2019 Child Psychotherapy Training Program

Rebecca Schwartz, PhD and Debbie Vuong, MFT, Co-Chairs

Latency and Adolescence

Psychoanalytically oriented treatment of children and adolescents makes demands on the therapist that are different than treatment of adults. Older children are on the threshold of new experiences of their minds and bodies. How do we reach these inner worlds when they often can’t use words to tell us about their experience?

The current year of this two-year program addresses school-age children and adolescents. Children often communicate through play, but some can't play. The therapist has to bring together the child's behaviors, and their own countertransference reactions, to try to arrive at the underlying meanings of the child's world. This two-year series of seminars addresses the relational, environmental and intra-psychic processes for both child and parents, and offers in-depth examples of interventions. The seminars use class discussion, readings and case presentations by instructors and participants. Attention will be paid to different theoretical orientations and to cultural and sexual diversity.

The Child Psychotherapy Training Program consists of two-years. This year we are focusing on Latency and Adolescence and next year we will focus on Infancy and Early Childhood. Students may enter at either year. Students will be subscribed to PEP-WEB through SFCP and will become SFCP Community Members.

Students are entitled to attend all Child Colloquia held at SFCP. The Child Analytic Program of the San Francisco Center for Psychoanalysis provides a free series of presentations demonstrating the scope of child psychoanalysis today. These events offer an opportunity to hear a range of ideas and participate in discussions contributing to enriching clinical work and theoretical training.

Certificate Program Option: 
The Child Psychotherapy Training Program is offering interested students the option of completing a certificate program. Upon completion of the program the student will be awarded a certificate from SFCP stating that they have completed the program in Child Psychotherapy Training. In order to receive the certificate, the student must:

  1. Complete the two-year curriculum; and
  2. Complete 40 hours of weekly supervision with a supervisor chosen from any Child Psychotherapy Seminar faculty, including those not currently teaching. Reduced fee supervision may be available if needed.
Dates: Wednesdays, September 12, 2018 - May 29, 2019
Time: 07:30pm - 09:00pm
Location: San Francisco Center for Psychoanalysis
444 Natoma Street
San Francisco, CA 94103
Program Fee: $ 1,750.00  General Admissions
$ 1,650.00  Students with a copy of Student ID provided

A Two-Installment-Plan option is available
see Policies tab for details
CME/CE: This program has been awarded 45.0 CME/CE credits.
To Apply: Click here to download the Application Form →

Wednesday, September 12, 2018
(no class on 09/19/2018)

Play provides a medium where a child's emotional realities can be understood and transformed. What are the different faces and levels of play with latency aged children? We will explore what we mean by latent and how this developmental stage impacts a child’s capacity to play. We will examine from various theoretical perspectives how the child therapist enters the play, listens with her whole being, and utilizes her countertransference and imagination to move around inside the play's metaphors.Play provides a medium where a child's emotional realities can be understood and transformed. What are the different faces and levels of play with latency aged children? We will explore what we mean by latent and how this developmental stage impacts a child’s capacity to play. We will examine from various theoretical perspectives how the child therapist enters the play, listens with her whole being, and utilizes her countertransference and imagination to move around inside the play's metaphors.

Wednesdays, September 26; October 3, 10, 17, 24, 31; November 7, 2018
Kristin Fiorella, MFT, MFA
This seminar has been awarded 10.5 CME/CE credits.

Educational Objectives:
Participants will be able to

  1. differentiate three theoretical perspectives of play.
  2. describe the developmental stage of latency.
  3. describe play for the latency aged child.
  4. identify mutative moments in play.
  5. identify technical implications for play with latency aged children who are autistic or have been severely neglected.

The transition to adolescence is a dynamic and intense one. It is a time of gathering and transforming oneself while confronted by changes in one’s body and one’s thinking. At the same time, infantile issues always are present with more evolved processes and feel particularly ripe in this transitional process to adolescence. This course will present both theoretical and clinical ideas about pre-adolescence looking at relationships, complicated feelings, cultural pressures and family dynamics.

Wednesdays, November 14, 28; December 5, 12, 2018; January 9, 2019
(no class on 11/21/2018, 12/19/2018, 12/26/2018 and 01/02/2019)
Reyna Cowan, PsyD, LCSW
This seminar has been awarded 7.5 CME/CE credits.

Educational Objectives:
Participant will be able to:

  1. Use writings on child treatment to develop a working understanding of their own clinical cases.
  2. Develop a working understanding of what a child is communicating through their play and how to use interventions to make contact with the child.
  3. Formulate an idea of how to use one’s countertransference in clinical work.
  4. Learn how to use the squiggle game as a way to understand the internal world of the child.
  5. Develop a working understanding of the no entry defense.
  6. Utilize developmental and theoretical concepts as a way to understand what a child is communicating.

This conversation about adolescence will consider “what’s normal, what’s not.” Through didactic material and case discussion, we will consider such issues as gender identity, sex and sexual development within the context of the psychological and physiological stages of adolescence. From Middle School to High School, peer pressure, school and family provide a context for the development of the adult mind, distinct but engaged with the oedipal and preoedipal family. Sex, drugs, and social media all provide for the expression of the seething cauldron of this complex developmental period.

Wednesdays, January 16, 23, 30; February 13, 20, 27; March 6, 2019
(no class on 02/06/2019)
Michael Donner, PhD
This seminar has been awarded 10.5 CME/CE credits.

Educational Objectives:
Participants will be able to

  1. distinguish between "what's normal, what's not" in adolescent development.
  2. distinguish the ways that gender identity, sex and sexual development arise within the context of the psychological and physiological stages of adolescence.
  3. learn how peer pressure, school and family provide a context for the development of the adult mind.
  4. describe how sex, drugs, and social media all provide for the expression of the developmental period.
  5. apply the various principles and issues of adolescent development directly to clinical work via case presentation and clinical discussion.

Participants will have the opportunity to present detailed process notes of sessions from their own active child and adolescent cases to their fellow classmates and to two experienced clinicians who will facilitate the discussions. Following each session closely, we will track the emotional tone of the patient-therapist interactions and the transference-countertransference. We will try to identify the child’s level of psychic functioning and his or her anxieties and defenses. We will discuss how to establish an appropriate frame and how to formulate interpretations or interventions that have the potential to facilitate the child’s psychic integration and growth. Working with the child’s, or adolescent’s parents to support the treatment will be considered as well.

Wednesdays, March 13, 20, 27; April 3, 10, 17, 24, 2019
Era Loewenstein, PhD and Gregory Villalba, LCSW
This seminar has been awarded 10.5 CME/CE credits.

Educational Objectives:
Participant will be able to

  1. After listening to a peer who will present clinical material from the psychotherapy of a school age child or an adolescent and engaging in a group discussion with the guidance of two experienced clinicians, participants will be able to identify the most appropriate points for therapeutic interventions in the presented hours.
  2. After listening to clinical material from the presented sessions with a patient, and following a group discussion, participants will be able to observe and describe the processes within the therapeutic interaction as they occurs, and increasingly identify the possible transference reactions the patients has and the countertransference reaction that the psychotherapist may have.
  3. observe and describe the patient’s responses to the clinician’s therapeutic interventions.
  4. describe at least two anxieties that most likely are impacting the patient in each session.
  5. describe how the clinician could integrate the child’s or adolescent’s response into further interactions, reflection and interventions.
  6. consider and adjust their suggested interventions to the developing therapeutic process as it unfolds in the presented session, and over the course of the treatment. They will demonstrate this ability by describing how they think that the therapist could intervene in the particular session presented.

In this class we will discuss a life cycle perspective of therapy, and explore how the transgenerational transmission of trauma works using clinical examples from both child and adult therapies.

If we are trained in understanding the life cycle, we can treat a person of any age. We show by playing and speaking with a child that we believe in putting the meaning being conveyed into words, one step removed from the experience of play. We can think about the play, which symbolizes what is felt and needs to be known for integrative purposes. When does the transition occur to a therapy with an adolescent or an adult who is sitting in the chair talking, using language symbolically, to describe an “as if” instead of acting out a reality? I would argue that all therapy is a kind of play therapy, in which we interact at the level of play, while starting to “think about” the play with the patient of any age. When we work with an adult we talk about their childhood in order to understand how they unconsciously hold past experiences. When we work with a child we talk to the parents in order to understand the transgenerational transmission of trauma. We help the parents speak about the “ghosts in the nursery”, the traumas of their past, that are unconsciously conveyed to their children via projection and unprocessed, split-off affect.

Wednesdays, May 1, 8, 15, 22, 2019
Amy Tyson, MD
This seminar has been awarded 6.0 CME/CE credits.

Educational Objectives:
Participants will be able to

  1. understand how character is formed in childhood.
  2. understand how character is transmitted via parents’ unconscious projection of their own trauma.
  3. understand how to listen to and interpret all forms of communication from patients of any age as play.
  4. understand how to listen to the child in the adult, and the adult in the child.

Wednesday, May 29, 2019
Rebecca Schwartz, PhD and Debbie Vuong, MFT

Certification Program Option

The Child Psychotherapy Training Program is offering interested students the option of completing a certificate program.  Upon completion of the program the student will be awarded a certificate from SFCP stating that they have complete the program in Child Psychotherapy Training.  In order to receive the certificate, the student must:

  • complete the two year curriculum; and
  • complete 40 hours of supervision with a supervisor chosen from any Child Psychotherapy Seminar faculty, including those not currently teaching.  Reduced fee supervision may be available if needed.

Eligibility

If you have any questions about your level of preparation, please contact the SFCP Office at 415-563-5815.

Registration Deposit

A $ 300.00 registration deposit is due upon registration.  This $ 300.00 deposit is fully refundable until August 11, 2018, and the remaining balance is due in full by August 15, 2018.

Two-Installment-Plan Option

A Two-Installment-Plan option is available for this program.  Tuition can be paid in two equal installments that will be processed on September 1, 2018 and January 2, 2019.  SFCP must have a current/active credit card information on file to be used for the payments.  To apply for the Two-Installment-Plan, one must contact the SFCP Office to arrange this option before August 15, 2018.

Readers Fee

The readers fee is included in the tuition fee.

CME/CE Credits Fee

The credits cost per hour is $10 for all SFCP members, and $12 for non-SFCP members.  SFCP has established a cap cost of $200 for credits requested per program.  The cost of CME/CE credits is separate from the program fees and billed individually upon the request for credits at the end of the seminar.

CME/CE Credits Policy and Attendance Requirement

APA Approved SponsorThe San Francisco Center for Psychoanalysis is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The San Francisco Center for Psychoanalysis maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

 

The San Francisco Center for Psychoanalysis is accredited by the Institute for Medical Quality/California Medical Association (IMQ/CMA) to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The San Francisco Center for Psychoanalysis takes responsibility for the content, quality and scientific integrity of this CME activity.

 

PHYSICIANS: The San Francisco Center for Psychoanalysis designates this educational activity for a maximum of 6.0 to 10.5 credits as listed for each individual program (please refer to the program description tab), AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. This credit may also be applied to the CMA Certification in Continuing Medical Education.

LCSWs/MFTs: The San Francisco Center for Psychoanalysis is an entity recognized by the Board of Behavioral Sciences to provide Continuing Education Credits pursuant to Section 1887.4.3.

PSYCHOLOGISTS: Psychologists attending SFCP events approved for CME credits may report AMA PRA Category 1Credit(s)™ toward their CE requirements. Psychologists self-certify the number of hours they have completed on their renewal form (whether online or paper).

EGISTERED NURSES: The San Francisco Center for Psychoanalysis is a provider approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider Number 02677, on an hour for hour basis.

Commercial Support: None

Faculty Disclosure: The following moderators and planning committee members have disclosed NO financial interest/arrangement or affiliation with commercial companies who have provided products or services, relating presentation(s) or commercial support for this continuing medical education activity: Rebecca Schwartz, PhD, Debbie Vuong, MFT, Michael Pastor, PhD, Phyllis Cath, MD, Era A. Loewenstein, PhD, Shahla Chehrazi, MD, Mahima Muralidharan, PsyD, Elizabeth Bradshaw, PsyD, Kristin Fiorella, MFT, MFA, Reyna Cowan, PsyD, LCSW, Michael Donner, PhD, Gregory Villalba, LCSW and Amy Tyson, MD. All conflicts of interest have been resolved in accordance with the ACCME Updated Standards for Commercial Support.

Physicians, Social Workers, Marriage and Family Therapists, and Registered Nurses will be awarded AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ on an hour for hour basis; see the program description for the maximum of credits awarded for each program.

Psychologists participating in long-term programs (lecture series) who can demonstrate a minimum of 80% attendance for a seminar within the series, are eligible to obtain these credits by notifying the SFCP office after the seminar has ended. Seminars of 4 sessions or fewer require 100% attendance. Participants will pay the appropriate fee for the seminar (based on the number of credits they obtain), and then will receive a verification letter of their attendance.

100% attendance is required for short-term programs (individual course).

Refund Policy

Before the Program Start Date

  • There will be a full refund if one requests to drop the program on or before August 11, 2018.
  • There will be a 10% cancellation fee if one requests to drop the program between August 12, 2018 and September 11, 2018.

After the Program Start Date

  • There will be a $ 300.00 cancellation fee if one requests to drop the program on or after September 12, 2018.  There will be no refund for classes in progress, and SFCP will provide a pro-rated refund of tuition for classes not yet begun.
  • The Readers fee is not refundable.