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This program has reached its maximum class size. Please call us at 415-563-5815 if you'd like to list your name in the Waiting List.

 

2016 - 2017 San Francisco Yearlong Program
Trauma and Its Vicissitudes

Meryl Botkin, PhD, Catherine Mallouh, MD, and Patricia Marra, MFT, Co-Chairs
Marilynne Kay Kanter, PhD, Israel Katz, MD, Era A. Loewenstein, PhD, Sue von Baeyer, PhD, and Catherine Witzling, PhD, LCSW, Committee Members

Trauma, which comes from the ancient Greek word for wound or damage, is fundamental and foundational to psychoanalysis. Trauma led patients with hysterical and other symptoms to Freud's consulting room, and trauma was one of the sparks that originated the psychoanalytic method when Freud listened to his patients and let their suffering speak.  We will be exploring the spoken, unspoken, and impossible to speak aspects of trauma and its vicissitudes during this San Francisco Extension Yearlong sequence: from external social traumas of war and violence to internal traumas of the sexual and death drives; from the psychoanalytic field and frame to the object relationship; from attachment theory to the world of psychic conflict and phantasy; from mutual love as trauma to the empty circle and alien self in relational trauma. We are looking forward to your joining us on this journey.
Dates:
Fridays, September 9, 2016 - June 2, 2017
Time:
12:00pm - 01:30pm  09/09/2016 - 04/07/2017
10:30am - 12:00pm  04/14/2017 - 04/28/2017
12:00pm - 01:30pm  05/05/2017 - 06/02/2017
Sessions
36 Sessions
Location:
San Francisco Center for Psychoanalysis
444 Natoma Street
San Francisco, CA 94103
Tuition Fees:
For SF Yearlong Program Didactic Courses only
$ 1,400.00  General Admission
$ 1,195.00  Community Members

For SF Yearlong Program Didactic Courses AND SF Continuing Case Conferencecombined
(The SF Continuing Case Conference is open to licensed and pre-licensed clinicians only)
$ 1,925.00  General Admission
$ 1,785.00  Community Members

Readers and CME/CE Credits fee are not included in the tuition
A Two-Installment-Plan option is available
See Registration Deposits, Refund Policy, Readers and CME/CE Fees Information tab for details
CME/CE:
This program has been awarded a total of 54 CME/CE credits.
To Register:
This program has reached its maximum class-size. Please contact us at 415-563-5815 if you'd like to add your name to the Waiting List.

 

Trauma, Attachment, and Psychoanalysis

Attachment theory is embedded in the development of relationships — the nature of the tie between the mother or caregiver and the infant. Bowlby sees social bonds as a primary biological given. Trauma, in attachment theory, focuses on the separation and/or loss of the primary caregiver. Bowlby’s theory of the profound traumatic effects of separation and loss in early childhood emphasizes the “real” experiences of the child that result in an “internal working model” of her relationships with others, stressing the “real” versus the fantasized experiences with caregivers.  Seen as accentuating the external over the internal, Bowlby was criticized for neglecting the internal world of drive, phantasy, conflict, unconscious processes, and the Oedipus complex.  Now, there are attempts to show the many points of contact between attachment theory and psychoanalysis by theorists such as Lyons-Ruth, Stern, Trevarthen, Holmes, Lieberman and the Boston Study Group, among others. This class will look at attachment theory and trauma, and its points of contact and divergence with the various theoretical schools within psychoanalytic theory.

Meryl Botkin, PhD
Fridays, September 9, 16, 23, 30; October 7, 14, 2016
This seminar has been awarded 9.0 CME/CE credits.

Educational Objectives
Participants will be able to

  1. identify the theoretical differences between Attachment Theory and Psychoanalytic object relations theory
  2. identify attachment seeking behaviors in the human infant and their evolutionary function.
  3. learn the different attachment classifications and be able to identify traumatic situations for infants and young children in terms of separation.
  4. identify the ways trauma is internalized and expressed in adulthood in terms of different forms of attachment.

 

Trauma: Ghosts in the Field and Frame

A clinical exploration of noticing, inviting, bearing, and witnessing trauma in the transference/countertransference field and the frame.  Readings:  Winnicott and Ogden, Bion, Cartwright, and maybe Parsons, Botellas.

John DiMartini, PhD
Catherine McKenzie, PhD
Fridays, October 21, 28; November 4, 11, 18; December 2, 2016
*no class on November 25th
This seminar has been awarded 9.0 CME/CE credits.

Educational Objectives
Participants will be able to

  1. identify and engage with dissociated states in the clinical situation.
  2. trace Winnicott’s concept of “fear of breakdown” as it is repeated in the clinical encounter.
  3. utilize concepts of symbiotic and fusional contact in the encounter with primitive, “phantom” psychic states.

 

Trauma Beyond Representation

A course with readings based on the impossible to represent and the yet-to-be represented in relation to the Sexual, the death drive, and trauma. Readings would include Lacan, Laplanche, Green and Aulagnier, with some possible excursions into some Latin American authors such as Marucco, Urribarri, Braunstein and Lutenberg.

Israel Katz, MD
Fridays, December 9, 16, 2016; January 6, 13, 20, 27, 2017
*no class on December 23rd and 30th
This seminar has been awarded 9.0 CME/CE credits.

Educational Objectives
Participants will be able to

  1. explain the notion of the impossible to represent as traumatic.
  2. discuss different conceptions of the death drive.
  3. discuss some examples of the work of the negative in the clinical situation.
  4. elaborate on the idea of transference as an enactment of the reality of the unconscious.

 

Mutual Love as Trauma

This course will consider mutual love as something that is, paradoxically, both healing and traumatic.  In the light of the renewed interest among analysts in transference love and the dangers posed by the psychoanalytic method, we will consider how mutual love is traumatic i.e. what is the nature of the dangers it poses to the psyche?  What are some theories (in particular, Freud’s and Laplanche’s) about the origins of this danger and what are the implications for the analytic relationship?  How can we help patients understand this danger and strengthen their capacity to cope with it?  

Diane E. Donnelly, PhD
Fridays, February 3, 10, 17, 24; March 3, 2017
This seminar has been awarded 7.5 CME/CE credits.

Educational Objectives
Participants will be able to

  1. become familiar through discussion with the phenomenon that success in love (mutual love) can pose a danger to higher mental functioning.
  2. identify, in light of the concept of trauma, specific ways in which mutual love can be traumatic.
  3. become conversant with theories about the origins of the “traumatic” aspect of mutual love.
  4. become able to recognize this phenomenon (that mutual love induces anxiety and can lead to a weakening or breakdown of mental functions in vulnerable individuals) and will then be able to help patients understand and cope with this issue.

 

An Object Relations Approach to Healing the Wounds of Psychic Trauma

A current object relations view on healing psychic relational trauma.  We explore the analyst’s ability to receive projective identifications, to metabolize and give them back in ways that promote the patient’s ability to integrate split off aspects of self/other experience, build narrative and mourn.  And to be available to the patient through receptivity, reverie, holding, containing and dreaming.  I would use my paper, "Healing psychic trauma through the psychoanalytic relationship"; Ogden’s paper “On holding, containing, being and dreaming”; Judith Teicholz’s paper “Treating trauma: The analysts own affect regulation and expression”; and others.

Suzanne Klein, PhD
Fridays, March 10, 17, 24, 29; April 7, 2017
This seminar has been awarded 7.5 CME/CE credits.

Educational Objectives
Participants will be able to

  1. learn and discuss the current Object Relations view on psychic trauma.
  2. describe how psychic relational trauma disrupts the trauma victim’s ability to maintain a cohesive self - narrative over time.
  3. learn how the therapist’s role in holding and containing the patient’s unbearable traumatic experiences helps facilitate the patient’s psychic integration, narrative building and mourning.

 

The Impact of Social Trauma

Unlike direct individual experiences of personal trauma, social trauma originates in large-scale, impersonal contexts - in marked upheavals caused by war, terror, and natural disasters, but also in cumulative dislocations resulting from changes in the socio-economic, cultural and technological environment. This course will explore the specific dissociative effects of social trauma on individual psychical life, and how these dissociative effects, which tend to be organized around control and reshaping of the body and of unconscious desire, differ from the PTSD-like symptoms that are the consequence of direct personal experiences of trauma and abuse.

Peter Goldberg, PhD
Fridays, April 14, 21, 28, 2017
*Note Time Change: 10:30am - 12:00noon
This seminar has been awarded 4.5 CME/CE credits.

Educational Objectives
Participants will be able to

  1. become familiar with current models of dissociative mental functioning and the relation of dissociation to trauma.
  2. consider the distinction between individual trauma and social trauma.
  3. review some the clinical implications of psycho-social trauma on the individual personality.

 

The Empty Circle and the Alien Self:  Relational Trauma and Its Repair

Peter Fonagy has recently said that contemporary psychoanalytic findings suggest that we ought to replace Descartes’s cogito ergo sum, “I think therefore I am” with “Mother thinks about me therefore I am.” In this seminar we will explore how a relational trauma comes into being when the mothering object is unable to think in an emotionally alive and meaningful way about the infant or the child, or is unable to see the child as a separate and autonomous person. Under circumstances like these the child’s mind forms around an empty circle, or an absence which is later filled with an alien self consisting of intrusive identifications which are fit mainly for evacuation. We will study the nature of this type of developmental trauma and its treatment by following clinical material and reading papers representing various perspectives on this subject by Winnicott, Ferro, Fonagy & Target, Tronick and Liotti.

Era A. Loewenstein, PhD
Fridays, May 5, 12, 19, 26; June 2, 2017
This seminar has been awarded 7.5 CME/CE credits.

Educational Objectives
Participants will be able to

  1. describe what Winnicott meant when he wrote that patients who were traumatized as infants try to search and represent verbally, in their treatment, a fear of breakdown that they have already experienced non-verbally.
  2. describe and give a clinical example of how unrepresented relational trauma can be experienced by the patient as an alien self.
  3. describe what Peter Fonagy means when he said that contemporary psychoanalytic perspectives and infant parent research suggests that we ought to replace Descarte’s cogito ergo sum, “I think therefore I am” with “Mother thinks about me therefore I am.”

Eligibility


If you have any questions about your level of preparation, please contact the San Francisco Yearlong Program Co-Chairs: Meryl Botkin, PhD, at 415-922-8966, or Catherine Mallouh, MD, at 415-750-1713, or Patricia Marra, MFT, at 415-668-0767.

 

Registration Deposit


A $ 300.00 registration deposit is due upon registration.  This $ 300.00 deposit is fully refundable until August 9, 2016, and the remaining balance is due in full by August 15, 2016.

 

Two-Installment-Plan Option


A Two-Installment-Plan option is available for this program.  Tuition can be paid in two equal installments that will be processed on September 1, 2016 and January 2, 2017.  SFCP must have a current/active credit card information on file to be used for the payments.  To apply for the Two-Installment-Plan, one must contact the SFCP Office to arrange this option before August 15, 2016.

 

Readers Fee


Charges for reading material required for the seminars are not included in tuition. They are based upon copyright laws and change based on the content of the readers. The charges will be billed to you separately. Please submit your registration and your tuition payment two weeks in advance in order to receive reading materials before the course starting date.

 

CME/CE Credits Fee


The credits cost per hour is $10 for all SFCP members, and $12 for non-SFCP members.  SFCP has established a cap cost of $200 for credits requested per program.  The cost of CME/CE credits is separate from the program fees and billed individually upon the request for credits at the end of the seminar.

 

Refund Policy


Before the Program Start Date

  • There will be a full refund if one requests to drop the program on or before August 9, 2016.
  • There will be a 10% cancellation fee if one requests to drop the program between August 10, 2016 and September 8, 2016.

After the Program Start Date

  • There will be a $ 300.00 cancellation fee if one requests to drop the program on or after September 9, 2016.  There will be no refund for classes in progress, and SFCP will provide a pro-rated refund of tuition for classes not yet begun.
  • The Readers fee is not refundable.

 

CME/CE Credits Policy and Attendance Requirement


CE LogoThe San Francisco Center for Psychoanalysis is accredited by the Institute for Medical Quality/California Medical Association (IMQ/CMA) to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The San Francisco Center for Psychoanalysis takes responsibility for the content, quality and scientific integrity of this CME activity.

PHYSICIANS: The San Francisco Center for Psychoanalysis designates this educational activity for a maximum of 4.5 to 9.0 credits as listed for each individual program (please refer to the program description tab), AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. This credit may also be applied to the CMA Certification in Continuing Medical Education.

LCSWs/MFTs: The San Francisco Center for Psychoanalysis is a provider approved by the Board of Behavioral Sciences, Provider Number PCE623, for 4.5 to 9.0 CE credits on an hour for hour basis (please refer to the program description tab).

PSYCHOLOGISTS: Psychologists attending SFCP events approved for CME credits may report AMA PRA Category 1Credit(s)™ toward their CE requirements. Psychologists self-certify the number of hours they have completed on their renewal form (whether online or paper). The San Francisco Center for Psychoanalysis is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The San Francisco Center for Psychoanalysis maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

REGISTERED NURSES: The San Francisco Center for Psychoanalysis is a provider approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider Number 02677, on an hour for hour basis.

SFCP is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. SFCP maintains responsibility for this program and its contents.

Commercial Support: None

Faculty Disclosure: The following moderators and planning committee members have disclosed NO financial interest/arrangement or affiliation with commercial companies who have provided products or services, relating presentation(s) or commercial support for this continuing medical education activity: Meryl Botkin, PhD, Catherine Mallouh, MD, Patricia Marra, MFT, John DiMartini, PhD, Catherine McKenzie, PhD, Israel Katz, MD, Diane E. Donnelly, PhD, Suzanne Klein, PhD, Peter Goldberg, PhD and Era A. Loewenstein, PhD. All conflicts of interest have been resolved in accordance with the ACCME Updated Standards for Commercial Support.

  • Physicians, Social Workers, Marriage and Family Therapists, and Registered Nurses will be awarded AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ on an hour for hour basis; see the program description for the maximum of credits awarded for each program.

  • Psychologists participating in long-term programs (lecture series) who can demonstrate a minimum of 80% attendance for a seminar within the series, are eligible to obtain these credits by notifying the SFCP office after the seminar has ended. Seminars of 4 sessions or fewer require 100% attendance. Participants will pay the appropriate fee for the seminar (based on the number of credits they obtain), and then will receive a verification letter of their attendance.

  • 100% attendance is required for short-term programs (individual course).

 

$1,400.00 15

 

 

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San Francisco Center for Psychoanalysis

444 Natoma Street
San Francisco, CA 94103


(415) 563-5815
(415) 857-7596
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