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2016 - 2017 East Bay Yearlong Program

Susan Yamaguchi, LCSW and Lara Weyland, PhD, Co-Chairs
David Socholitzky, PhD and Diana C. Fuery, PhD, LCSW, Committee Members

Inside The Analytic Frame: Its Role in the Creation of Symbolic Therapeutic Space

The concept The Analytic Frame is both literal and symbolic. Literally, It is the set of rules and conventions structuring the therapeutic hour—time, session length, fees, cancellations, the expectation that the patient will speak freely, etc. And it is the reality of the Frame that creates symbolic analytic space. By facilitating symbolic understanding of deviations from these rules, the Frame facilitates symbolic interpretation of the patient’s relationship to the external, to her or his unconscious, and to the therapist or analyst.

This concrete structure also exists symbolically in the mind of the analyst and is communicated both consciously and unconsciously through the therapist’s language, responses to the patient’s conscious and unconscious expressions, and overall stance. The therapist’s theory of the unconscious, consciously- and unconsciously-held theories, her tendency to privilege certain communications—these, too, are expressed in the Frame as created by that clinician. The therapist may also find that he consciously or unconsciously modifies the Frame to meet the needs of particular patients.

This year’s program examines the Analytic Frame theoretically and clinically. Courses will present theoretical perspectives on the Frame and also examine how one monitors and adjusts the functioning of the Frame to facilitate a more communicative and symbolic relationship with particular patients.

Dates:
Fridays, September 9, 2016 - May 5, 2017
Time:
12:00noon - 01:30pm
Sessions:
32 Sessions
Location:
The Dream Institute
1672 University Avenue
Berkeley, CA 94702
Tuition Fee:
$ 1,220.00

Readers and CME/CE Credits Fee are not included in the tuition
A Two-Installment-Plan option is available
see Registration Deposit, Refund Policy, Readers and CME/CE Fees information tab for details
CME/CE:
This program has been awarded a total of 48 CME/CE credits.
To Register:
Click here to register for this program now

 

Introduction and Overview

In these two meetings we introduce basic clinical applications of the concepts of the Frame and its functioning. Through discussion of brief vignettes from Instructors’ and Attendees’ clinical work, we will discuss together the presence, use and misuse of the Frame in ordinary, every-day session material as an introduction to our yearlong exploration of the topic.

David Socholitzky, PhD, Member, SFCP
Susan Yamaguchi, LCSW, Member & Faculty, SFCP
Fridays, September 9, 16, 2016
This seminar has been awarded 3.0 CME/CE credits.

Educational Objectives
Participants will be able to

  1. identify the reality components of the frame and begin discussion of the functioning of the frame and its impact upon patient and therapist from the moment therapeutic collaboration begins.
  2. develop a beginning understanding of how simple but significant deviations from the frame can be referenced in everyday therapeutic interaction.
  3. listen for conscious and unconscious references to aspects of the frame in the language and associations of the patient and in the thought and behavior of the therapist.

 

A Theoretical Introduction to the Structure, Function and Therapeutic Use of the Analytic Frame

The analytic frame is a complex set of interlocking conditions required to bring forth a particular psychological and affective relationship between patient and analyst, a relationship that will, in turn, allow for an analytic process to develop. While many theoreticians conceptualize and emphasize different structural aspects of the frame, such as time, place and money, it will be helpful to review basic assumptions we traditionally have held in light of actual clinical observations of interventions that have proved most dispositive in the emergence of such a process, as well as some implications of failing to take them into account.

Throughout the entire course, theoretical and clinical discussions in class will examine the importance of establishing and monitoring the frame—it’s spatial, temporal and contractual aspects, as well as its ‘containing’ functions. We will read works of Bleger, Baranger, Mom, Quinodoz, Steiner and other authors in order to better understand the significance and function of the frame. In addition, we will focus on studying the ways in which our nuanced attention to the frame can help us evoke and address different kinds and levels of communication from patients, which can enhance our ability to facilitate analytic change.

Susana Winkel, PhD, Member & Faculty, SFCP; Faculty, PINC; Professor, The Wright Institute; Assistant Clinical Professor, UC Berkeley
Fridays, September 23, 30; October 7, 14, 2016
This seminar has been awarded 6.0 CME/CE credits.

Educational Objectives
Participants will be able to

  1. develop an understanding of the importance of the Frame to creating a psychological and affective relationship between patient and therapist.
  2. understand what is meant by “an analytic relationship” and the role of the analytic frame in fostering its development.
  3. elaborate and apply to their own clinical practice the myriad ways in which the Frame evokes communication from patients which can eventually be symbolically understood and apply to their own clinical work a conceptualization of establishing, monitoring and interpreting issues related to the Frame.
  4. understand and employ in thinking about their own clinical work the contrast between traditional assumptions concerning frame interpretations and clinical observation.
  5. consider ways in which one’s concept of the Frame must be understood in the context of racial, ethnic and gender diversity.

 

Case Conference: The Frame in Action in Participants’ Cases

Through presentation and discussion of clinical hours in which presenters are seeking help in understanding clinical difficulties or dilemmas, this 10-week Conference offers an opportunity for in-depth clinical examination of the functioning of the Frame and the opportunity to integrate the year’s didactic discussions with immediate clinical concerns. Instructors will also offer examples from their own work for discussion.

David Socholitzky, PhD, Member, SFCP
Susan Yamaguchi, LCSW, Member & Faculty, SFCP
Fridays, October 21, 28; November 4, 11, 18; December 2, 9, 16, 2016; January 6, 13, 2017
This seminar has been awarded 15.0 CME/CE credits.

Educational Objectives
Participants will be able to

  1. through didactic presentations and presentation and discussion of cases, develop a deeper understanding of functioning of the frame and its impact upon patient and therapist that can develop even before therapeutic collaboration begins.
  2. develop a deeper understanding of how simple but significant deviations from the frame can be identified, understood and interpreted in everyday therapeutic interaction, as well as in more complex therapeutic experiences.
  3. through didactic presentations and presentation and discussion of cases observe and understand how every patient’s use of the Frame can reveal to us her or his core task in the treatment.
  4. understand the manner in which the Frame as it exists in the unconscious of both patient and therapist affects the use of symbolic therapeutic space by both parties in the interaction.
  5. learn how to listen for conscious and unconscious references to aspects of the frame in the language and associations of the patient and in the thought and behavior of the therapist.
  6. learn how to listen for conscious and unconscious references to aspects of the frame in the language and associations of the patient and in the thought and behavior of the therapist.
  7. consider ways in which one’s concept of the Frame must be understood in the context of racial, ethnic and gender diversity.

 

Vicissitudes of Love and Hate in the Transference: A Close reading of Envy and Gratitude

This class offers a close reading of Envy and Gratitude so we can think together about the clinical implications of Klein’s model of object relations: specifically about the processes of development in the evolution of creative and destructive impulses in the individual mind and about how the tension between love and hate is shaped by an interaction of outer world experiences and inner experiences. Clinical discussion will focus on how the therapist might listen to and understand rapid and complex shifts in the patient’s way of relating that may also involve attacks on the therapeutic function of the frame.

Georgine Marrott, PhD, Training & Supervising Analyst, Member & Faculty, SFCP; Personal & Supervising Analyst, PINC
Fridays, January 20, 27; February 3, 10, 2017
This seminar has been awarded 6.0 CME/CE credits.

Educational Objectives
Participants will be able to

  1. develop an understanding of how Klein’s object relations theory defines and identifies the infant’s creative and destructive impulses and outlines their interaction and development over time.
  2. develop an understanding of the way the tension between loving and hating arises in the individual mind through interaction of experiences with real objects, and the internalization of those objects.
  3. develop an understanding of the consequences of early developmental experiences for the structure of the capacity of the mind to develop a loving or a fearful and hating relationship to the external world.
  4. develop an understanding of how this theoretical approach leads to a conceptualization of the therapeutic aspect of the Frame.
  5. understand, through discussion of clinical work, the way problems in the development of the capacities to love and to make reparation can appear in complex modes of relating in the transference and in the patient’s relationship to the therapeutic Frame.
  6. consider ways in which Kleinian developmental and clinical theory and approach to the concept of the Frame can be understood in the context of racial, ethnic and sexual and gender diversity.

 

Monitoring Use of the Frame to Understand the Perverse Patient

The perverse patient’s fundamental orientation is to attempt to undermine and erode the structure of analytic work, represented most overtly by the Frame that we try to establish with our patients. One of the very important functions of the Frame is to allow us to more effectively track and respond to the pressures which these patients bring to their work with us. In this class we will employ readings and discussion of case examples to explore how we can better make use of our thinking about the Frame to help us with this crucial aspect of our work with perverse patients.

Robert Bartner, PhD, Member & Faculty, SFCP; Faculty, Personal & Supervising Analyst, PINC
Fridays, February 17, 24; March 3, 10, 2017
*no class on March 17th and 24th
This seminar has been awarded 6.0 CME/CE credits.

Educational Objectives
Participants will be able to

  1. understand the psychoanalytic definition of perversion, and how the definition relates to patients' attempt to undermine analytic and therapeutic work.
  2. understand how perverse patients put pressures upon their therapist to think or behave in certain ways.
  3. identify and track the use of the frame by perverse patients and relate it to the patient's personal dynamic issues.
  4. understand how pressures from perverse patients appear in and are enacted in the transferencecountertransference.
  5. consider cultural, racial, class and gender components of the dynamic issues presented in general and in the transference by perverse patients.

 

The Frame and the Sexual: Challenges, Perils, Breakdowns, and Breaches

The erotic transference and countertransference can challenge the frame of treatment, leading to fraught encounters, sometimes to boundary violations. In this seminar we will examine how clinicians from different orientations approach work with the erotic transference and countertransference in order to maintain the frame and deepen their understanding of their patient.

Laurie Goldsmith, PhD, Member & Faculty, SFCP
Diana C. Fuery, PhD, LCSW, Member & Faculty, SFCP
Fridays, April 1, 8, 15, 22, 29; Mary 5, 2017
This seminar has been awarded 9.0 CME/CE credits.

Educational Objectives
Participants will be able to

  1. describe and understand the significance of Freud’s recommendations on transference love to clinical exploration of both the transference an countertransference .
  2. describe and apply to their clinical practice the impact of early boundary violations on the practice of psychotherapy.
  3. explain what Laplanche means by The Sexual, and its significance in the theoretical and clinical understanding of gender and sexuality.
  4. apply Laplanche’s idea of The Sexual to a case in their own practice.
  5. consider how issues of gender and sexuality are likely to be perceived and understood differently by patients of differing racial, ethnic, class and sexual and gender diversity.

 

The setting as the body of the analyst, the analyst’s body as an aspect of the setting

The therapeutic setting is generally thought of as the physical arrangements of the office as well as the contract between patient and analyst. Many include in a description of the setting the internal environment of the analyst. In these two meetings we will be discussing a particular aspect of the setting, that is, the setting as the body of the analyst, and the analyst's body as part of the setting. Brief readings will be assigned but the centerpiece of our meetings will be discussions of case vignettes by all of us that demonstrate these concepts as well as vignettes that we bring to one another to see if they, too, illustrate these aspects of the embodied setting.

Abby Wolfson, PhD, Member & Faculty, Training & Supervising Analyst, SFCP; Personal & Supervising Analyst, PINC
Fridays, May 12, 17, 2017
This seminar has been awarded 3.0 CME/CE credits.

Educational Objectives
Participants will be able to

  1. develop awareness of how even subtle differences in the body and the dress of the therapist will affect patients’ experience of the therapeutic relationship.
  2. develop awareness of the ways the patient is relating to the setting of the office and to the therapist as if to parts of the therapist’s body.
  3. consider how issues of the therapist’s body and the overall setting are likely to be perceived and understood differently by patients of differing racial, ethnic, class and sexual and gender diversity.

Eligibility


This program is designed for psychotherapists seeking further education in psychoanalytic psychotherapy. Participants in treatment with one of the instructors should inquire about the opportunity to take a comparable course in one of the other programs.

If you have any questions about your level of preparation, please contact either of the East Bay Extension Division Yearlong Chair, David Socholitzky, PhD, at 510-548-3913

* A small number of participants with academic or artistic backgrounds may apply to the seminar series with permission of the Chair of the SFCP Extension Division. The Chair will consider these applications case-by-case and offer participation as space allows. In addition, anyone participating must meet with the Chair to discuss confidentiality rules concerning clinical material and sign an agreement to uphold confidentiality.

 

Registration Deposit


A $ 300.00 registration deposit is due upon registration.  This $ 300.00 deposit is fully refundable until August 9, 2016, and the remaining balance is due in full by August 15, 2016.

 

Two-Installment-Plan Option


A Two-Installment-Plan option is available for this program.  Tuition can be paid in two equal installments that will be processed on September 1, 2016 and January 2, 2017.  SFCP must have a current/active credit card information on file to be used for the payments.  To apply for the Two-Installment-Plan, one must contact the SFCP Office to arrange this option before August 15, 2016.

 

Readers Fee


Charges for reading material required for the seminars are not included in tuition. They are based upon copyright laws and change based on the content of the readers. The charges will be billed to you separately. Please submit your registration and your tuition payment two weeks in advance in order to receive reading materials before the course starting date.

 

CME/CE Credits Fee


The credits cost per hour is $10 for all SFCP members, and $12 for non-SFCP members. SFCP has established a cap cost of $200 for credits requested per program. The cost of CME/CE credits is separate from the program fees and billed individually upon the request for credits at the end of the seminar.

 

Refund Policy


Before the Program Start Date

  • There will be a full refund if one requests to drop the program on or before August 9, 2016.
  • There will be a 10% cancellation fee if one requests to drop the program between August 10, 2016 and September 8, 2016.

After the Program Start Date

  • There will be a $ 300.00 cancellation fee if one requests to drop the program on or after September 9, 2016.  There will be no refund for classes in progress, and SFCP will provide a pro-rated refund of tuition for classes not yet begun.
  • The Readers fee is not refundable.

 

CME/CE Credits Policy and Attendance Requirement


CE LogoThe San Francisco Center for Psychoanalysis is accredited by the Institute for Medical Quality/California Medical Association (IMQ/CMA) to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The San Francisco Center for Psychoanalysis takes responsibility for the content, quality and scientific integrity of this CME activity.

PHYSICIANS: The San Francisco Center for Psychoanalysis designates this educational activity for a maximum of 4.5 to 9.0 credits as listed for each individual program (please refer to the program description tab), AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. This credit may also be applied to the CMA Certification in Continuing Medical Education.

LCSWs/MFTs: The San Francisco Center for Psychoanalysis is a provider approved by the Board of Behavioral Sciences, Provider Number PCE623, for 4.5 to 9.0 CE credits on an hour for hour basis (please refer to the program description tab).

PSYCHOLOGISTS: Psychologists attending SFCP events approved for CME credits may report AMA PRA Category 1Credit(s)™ toward their CE requirements. Psychologists self-certify the number of hours they have completed on their renewal form (whether online or paper). The San Francisco Center for Psychoanalysis is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The San Francisco Center for Psychoanalysis maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

REGISTERED NURSES: The San Francisco Center for Psychoanalysis is a provider approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider Number 02677, on an hour for hour basis.

SFCP is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. SFCP maintains responsibility for this program and its contents.

Commercial Support: None

Faculty Disclosure: The following moderators and planning committee members have disclosed NO financial interest/arrangement or affiliation with commercial companies who have provided products or services, relating presentation(s) or commercial support for this continuing medical education activity: Susan Yamaguchi, LCSW, Lara Weyland, PhD, David Socholitzky, PhD, Diana C. Fuery, PhD, LCSW, Susana Winkel, PhD, Georgine Marrott, PhD, Robert Bartner, PhD, Laurie Goldsmith, PhD, Diana C. Fuery, PhD, LCSW and Abby Wolfson, PhD. All conflicts of interest have been resolved in accordance with the ACCME Updated Standards for Commercial Support.

  • Physicians, Social Workers, Marriage and Family Therapists, and Registered Nurses will be awarded AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ on an hour for hour basis; see the program description for the maximum of credits awarded for each program.

  • Psychologists participating in long-term programs (lecture series) who can demonstrate a minimum of 80% attendance for a seminar within the series, are eligible to obtain these credits by notifying the SFCP office after the seminar has ended. Seminars of 4 sessions or fewer require 100% attendance. Participants will pay the appropriate fee for the seminar (based on the number of credits they obtain), and then will receive a verification letter of their attendance.

  • 100% attendance is required for short-term programs (individual course).

 

 

$1,220.00 12

 

 

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