San Francisco Yearlong Program 2014 - 2015

San Francisco Yearlong Program 2014 - 2015

Meryl Botkin, PhD and Patricia Marra, MFT, Co-Chairs
Marilynne Kay Kanter, PhD, Israel Katz, MD, Catherine Mallouh, MD, Sue von Baeyer, PhD, Catherine Witzling, PhD
Committee Members

Shifting Encounters: Working with Levels of Psychic Functioning

When we enter the consulting room, we encounter the represented, the nonrepresented, and the unrepresentable — sometimes within one session, sometimes among our various patients. At times, these levels overlap, other times they are quite distinct. With the represented, we have a metaphoric landing in the symbolic realms of words and dreams. With the nonrepresented, we have a chance to access and metabolize the unthought known. And with the unrepresentable, we are in the primordial world of sensory impressions, protomental, and prelinguistic experience.

Staying receptive to these various levels of psychic functioning is staying open to “what is happening.” But, what is created in us as we stay open to these encounters? We are not always aware of what level of psychic functioning we are encountering. We may experience the patient as more "put together" and slowly begin to realize we are dealing with more primitive and archaic processes. What alerts us to these different levels and how do we make sense of them? How do we "know" and how does that knowledge inform how we intervene?

In this year’s program, we will take a look at many forms and levels of psychic functioning as we encounter: the absence generated by frozen traumatic states, the void of the negative and the Real, protomental stirrings, the oscillation between primitive paranoid schizoid states and the depressive position, as well as the fluctuations in psychic functioning occurring in adolescence, within couples, and in group dynamics.

Date: Fridays, September 5, 2014 - May 29, 2015
Time: 12:00pm - 01:30pm Didactic Seminar
01:45pm - 03:00pm Continuous Case Conference
Sessions: 70 Sessions
Location: San Francisco Center for Psychoanalysis
444 Natoma Street
San Francisco, CA 94103
Tuition Fees: $ 1,900.00
Reader and CME/CE credit fees are not included in the tuition
see Registration and Fees, Refund Policy, and CME/CE Credit Information tab for details
CME/CE: This program has been awarded a total of 96.25 CME/CE credits.
To Register: Click here to register for this program online
 
or call 415-563-5815

 

Black Holes and Empty Circles: Contemporary Perspectives on Primary Trauma

Relentless breaching of the young child’s protective shield during the period of absolute dependency, a time the mind is undifferentiated from “not me,” leads to primary trauma. This annihilating experience cannot be spoken about as it was not represented. A “black hole with a nasty prick” described by Frances Tustin’s young patient, John, who was in a state of sheer panic, or the “empty circle” dream element in the nightmare of Dori Laub’s patient, Mrs. A, capture patients’ desperate attempts to represent and give “figurability” to agonizing and unrepresentable infantile experiences. In this seminar we will explore the clinical manifestations of these early states of nameless dread. We will study the impact of the too muchness of an invasive object, or the negative created by an absent other. We will become acquainted with these primitive states by discussing our own clinical examples in the context of close reading of Ferenczi, Winnicott, Tustin, Cesar & Sara Botella, René Roussillon and Dori Laub.

Era A. Loewenstein, PhD
Fridays, September 5, 12, 19, 26; October 3, 10, 2014
This seminar has been awarded 9 CME/CE credits.

Educational Objectives

Participants will be able to

  1. describe what Freneczi meant when he suggested that the abused and traumatized child defends against the pain of the trauma by “identifying with the aggressor.”
  2. describe what Winnicott intended when he wrote that patients who were traumatized as infants try to search and represent verbally, in their treatment, a fear of breakdown that they have already experienced non-verbally.
  3. describe what Winnicott had in mind when he wrote that the patient needs to gather under his or her omnipotent control, with the help of the analyst or the therapist, the experience of agony, which was never consciously experienced, in order to put the trauma into the past tense.
  4. Based on the seminar reading and discussion participants will be able to describe and give clinical example of how unrepresented trauma is transmitted from one generation to the other.

 

In Transition: Understanding the Adolescent

In this course, we will look at the different types of psychopathology that may emerge in the adolescent phase of development. We will pay particular attention to primitive psychic functioning as it emerges along a continuum that also allows for the recognition of relative psychological health in teens. Alongside readings, we will focus on effective techniques utilized in the treatment of adolescents in an effort to enhance and expand our considerations of this often tumultuous period of development.

Terrence Owens, PhD
Fridays, October 17, 24, 31; November 7, 2014
This seminar has been awarded 6 CME/CE credits.

Educational Objectives

Participants will be able to

  1. develop an improved understanding of adolescent developmental processes; this will include an increased understanding of both cognitive and emotional changes.
  2. gain knowledge regarding primitive states of mind in adolescents. We will pay particular attention to primitive psychic functioning and follow a continuum that allows for the recognition of relative psychological health.
  3. Clinical technique in the treatment of adolescents will be emphasized. Participants will develop their ability to treat adolescents at different points of development as well as think about how to respond to varied types of psychological disturbance.

 

The Inescapable Power of the Group in Unconscious Life

This class will attend to unconscious psychic functioning in groups and will explore the complexities that arise when multiple levels of group and individual dynamics intersect. A psychoanalytically informed awareness of group dynamics can bring into high relief unconscious psychic functioning that, although present and powerful, is often more obscure in working with individuals and couples. Also, since much of our learning as clinicians occurs in groups, recognizing the effect of group dynamics can free us to make fuller use of these group learning experiences.

Charles Brandes, PhD
Fridays, November 14, 21; December 5, 12, 19, 2014
This seminar has been awarded 7.5 CME/CE credits.

Educational Objectives

Participants will be able to

  1. recognize the effects of unconscious processes in themselves when working with groups, individuals and couples.
  2. recognize and articulate the effects of unconscious processes in the people they work with in groups, as individuals and in couples.
  3. recognize and distinguish the effects of individual and group dynamics as they are expressed in the clinical situation.

 

Heterogeneities of the Clinical Situation: Oedipus, Narcissus, and the Impossible to Bear

We will examine the diversity of levels of psychic functioning that appear in our work and their engagement in everyday clinical practice. We will review Marucco's work on the zones of psychic functioning and explore the realms related to desire and repressed representation, narcissism and disavowal, the negative, trauma, and the impossible that is all too real.

Israel Katz, MD
Fridays, January 9, 16, 23, 30; February 6, 13, 2015
This seminar has been awarded 9 CME/CE credits.

Educational Objectives

Participants will be able to

  1. describe the mechanisms of repression, disavowal and foreclosure
  2. apply the idea of the work of the negative in the clinical situation.
  3. define the impossible to bear and its relationships and non-relationships to the death drive, repetition and trauma.

 

Oscillating Modalities of Psychic Functioning: Paranoid Schizoid and Depressive Positions

Melanie Klein conceived of the paranoid-schizoid and depressive positions as a “constellation” of interactive emotions, defenses and psychic processes, all of which group around a particular object relationship. Subsequent clinicians have elaborated on Mrs. Klein’s original model, most especially by showing how these two positions are in a dialectical relationship to one another. In this six-week class, we will consider how Melanie Klein used the concept of the paranoid-schizoid and depressive positions in her clinical work. Next, we will consider how Wilfred Bion, Ron Britton, and Betty Joseph expand our understanding of the nature of the ongoing oscillations between these two levels of functioning, and explore their ideas on how to clinically intervene at each level. We will consider the shifting modalities in psychic functioning for the patient, the therapist, and the therapeutic couple.

Margo Chapin, MFT
Fridays, February 20, 27; March 6, 13, 20, 27, 2015
This seminar has been awarded 9 CME/CE credits.

Educational Objectives

Participants will be able to

  1. describe the main principles of the paranoid-schizoid position.
  2. describe the main principles of the Depressive position.
  3. describe the mental state of the therapist when the patient oscillates between between the paranoid and depressive positions.

 

The Necessity of Losing One’s Mind

Self and object originate in a primordial (proto-mental) medium to which both belong. This class will focus on primitive confusional anxieties and states of experiences dominated by sensory, autistic, and primitive fusion. We will pay particular attention to how these non-symbolized states manifest clinically drawing on Bleger’s concepts of symbiosis and ambiguity, Civitarese’s and Ogden’s ideas about the sensory floor, and the sensory rhythmicity of Winnicott's “going on being.”

Catherine McKenzie, PhD
John DiMartini, PhD
Fridays, April 10, 17, 24; May 1, 2015
This seminar has been awarded 6 CME/CE credits.

Educational Objectives

Participants will be able to

  1. apply fundamental psychoanalytic principles to enhance their clinical effectiveness by becoming more attuned to primitive confusional states operating in the therapeutic environment
  2. learn, by exploring contributions from various psychoanalytic thinkers, how to “speak” when the self and other are not separate.
  3. recognize the points of urgency in clinical work where unsymbolized, pre-conceptual, non-verbal and somatic cues alert both patient and therapist to moments of therapeutic transformation.

 

Space, Motion, Stasis: Implications of Psychic Functioning in Couples

How does the psychic functioning of each individual impact the shape, feel, and creative possibility of couple relationships? How does a couple relationship impact individual psychic functioning? We will explore some selected papers from the literature on couples from the Tavistock Center for Couple Relationships, heavily influenced by Meltzer, Bion, and Klein. Attention will also be given to questions of containment, creativity, and psychic gridlock..

Julie Friend, LCSW
Fridays, May 8, 15, 22, 29, 2015
This seminar has been awarded 6 CME/CE credits.

Educational Objectives

Participants will be able to

  1. understand the impact of P-S psychic functioning on couple relating.
  2. understand the impact of depressive position psychic functioning on couple relating
  3. gain understanding of how different levels of psychic functioning in the couple orient the approach and technique of the couple the couple therapist.

 

Continuous Case Conferences

Meryl Botkin, PhD
Catherine Witzling, PhD
Fridays, September 5, 12, 19, 26; October 3, 10, 2014
This seminar has been awarded 7.5 CME/CE credits.

Meryl  Botkin, PhD, is a Member and Faculty of SFCP.  She received her undergraduate and graduate degrees from UC Berkeley and trained at Stanford’s Children’s Hospital.  Dr. Botkin is an Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at UCSF, and has taught several courses at CPMC and SFCP.  She maintains a private practice in San Francisco.

Educational Objectives

Participants will be able to

  1. describe what Freneczi meant when he suggested that the abused and traumatized child defends against the pain of the trauma by “identifying with the aggressor.”
  2. describe what Winnicott intended when he wrote that patients who were traumatized as infants try to search and represent verbally, in their treatment, a fear of breakdown that they have already experienced non-verbally.
  3. describe what Winnicott had in mind when he wrote that the patient needs to gather under his or her omnipotent control, with the help of the analyst or the therapist, the experience of agony, which was never consciously experienced, in order to put the trauma into the past tense.
  4. Based on the seminar reading and discussion participants will be able to describe and give clinical example of how unrepresented trauma is transmitted from one generation to the other.

 

Continuous Case Conferences

Gary Grossman, PhD
Fridays, October 17, 24, 31; November 7, 2014
This seminar has been awarded 5 CME/CE credits.

Educational Objectives

Participants will be able to

  1. develop an improved understanding of adolescent developmental processes; this will include an increased understanding of both cognitive and emotional changes.
  2. gain knowledge regarding primitive states of mind in adolescents. We will pay particular attention to primitive psychic functioning and follow a continuum that allows for the recognition of relative psychological health.
  3. Clinical technique in the treatment of adolescents will be emphasized. Participants will develop their ability to treat adolescents at different points of development as well as think about how to respond to varied types of psychological disturbance.

 

Continuous Case Conferences

Eric Glassgold, MD
Fridays, November 14, 21; December 5, 12, 19, 2014
This seminar has been awarded 6.25 CME/CE credits.

Educational Objectives

Participants will be able to

  1. recognize the effects of unconscious processes in themselves when working with groups, individuals and couples.
  2. recognize and articulate the effects of unconscious processes in the people they work with in groups, as individuals and in couples.
  3. recognize and distinguish the effects of individual and group dynamics as they are expressed in the clinical situation.

 

Continuous Case Conferences

Catherine Mallouh, MD
Marilynne Kay Kanter, PhD
Fridays, January 9, 16, 23, 30; February 6, 13, 2015
This seminar has been awarded 7.5 CME/CE credits.

Educational Objectives

Participants will be able to

  1. describe the mechanisms of repression, disavowal and foreclosure
  2. apply the idea of the work of the negative in the clinical situation.
  3. define the impossible to bear and its relationships and non-relationships to the death drive, repetition and trauma.

 

Continuous Case Conferences

Dr. Helen Schoenhals Hart
Katherine MacVicar, MD
Fridays, February 20, 27; March 6, 13, 20, 27, 2015
This seminar has been awarded 7.5 CME/CE credits.

Educational Objectives

Participants will be able to

  1. describe the main principles of the paranoid-schizoid position.
  2. describe the main principles of the Depressive position.
  3. describe the mental state of the therapist when the patient oscillates between between the paranoid and depressive positions.

 

Continuous Case Conferences

Sue von Baeyer, PhD
Mary Ewert, DMH
Fridays, April 10, 17, 24; May 1, 2015
This seminar has been awarded 5 CME/CE credits.

Educational Objectives

Participants will be able to

  1. apply fundamental psychoanalytic principles to enhance their clinical effectiveness by becoming more attuned to primitive confusional states operating in the therapeutic environment
  2. learn, by exploring contributions from various psychoanalytic thinkers, how to “speak” when the self and other are not separate.
  3. recognize the points of urgency in clinical work where unsymbolized, pre-conceptual, non-verbal and somatic cues alert both patient and therapist to moments of therapeutic transformation.

 

Continuous Case Conferences

Gary Grossman, PhD
Fridays, May 8, 15, 22, 29, 2015
This seminar has been awarded 5 CME/CE credits.

Educational Objectives

Participants will be able to

  1. understand the impact of P-S psychic functioning on couple relating.
  2. understand the impact of depressive position psychic functioning on couple relating
  3. gain understanding of how different levels of psychic functioning in the couple orient the approach and technique of the couple the couple therapist.

Eligibility

This program is designed for psychotherapists seeking further education in psychoanalytic psychotherapy. Registration is for a seminar series combined with a continuous case conference. Participants in treatment with one of the instructors should inquire about the opportunity to take a comparable course in one of the other programs.

If you have any questions about your level of preparation, please contact either of the San Francisco Extension Division Yearlong Co-Chairs: Meryl Botkin, Ph.D., at 415-922-8966, or Patricia Marra, M.F.T., at 415-668-0767.

* A small number of participants with academic or artistic backgrounds may apply to the seminar series with permission of the Chair of the SFCP Extension Division. The Chair will consider these applications case-by-case and offer participation as space allows. In addition, anyone participating must meet with the Chair to discuss confidentiality rules concerning clinical material and sign an agreement to uphold confidentiality.

 

Registration

 

Course Tuition Fee and Refund Policy

Fee is $ 1,900.00; 70 sessions; A $ 300.00 deposit is due upon registration.  This $ 300.00 deposit is fully refundable until August 1, 2014, and the remaining balance is due in full by August 15, 2014 and is not refundable;  A two-installment plan and a ten-installment plan is available for this program.  If applying for installmnet plan, you must arrange with the office by September 1, 2014.  Please click here for Installment Plan detail.

Cost of readers and CME/CE credits fees are not included in tuition. 

 

Discounted Fee

Only one of the following discounts can be used for each registration:

  • Community Members may deduct 10% from the registration fees.
  • Students may deduct 25% from the registration fees with student ID provided at the time of registration.

 

Readers Fee

Charges for reading material required for the seminars are not included in tuition. They are based upon copyright laws and change based on the content of the readers. The charges will be billed to you separately. Please submit your registration and your tuition payment two weeks in advance in order to receive reading materials before the course starting date.

 

CME/CE Credit Fee

This program has been awarded a total of 96.25 CME/CE credits. The credits cost per hour is $10 for all SFCP members, and $12 for non SFCP members. SFCP has established a cap cost of $200 for credits requested per program. The cost of CME/CE credits is separate from the programs fees and billed individually upon the request for credits at the end of the seminar.

 

CME/CE Attendance Requirements

  • Physicians, Social Workers, Marriage and Family Therapists, and Registered Nurses will be awarded AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ on an hour for hour basis; see the program description for the maximum of credits awarded for each program.
  • Psychologists participating in long-term programs (lecture series) who can demonstrate a minimum of 80% attendance for a seminar within the series, are eligible to obtain these credits by notifying the SFCP office after the seminar has ended. Seminars of 4 sessions or fewer require 100% attendance. Participants will pay the appropriate fee for the seminar (based on the number of credits they obtain), and then will receive a verification letter of their attendance.
  • 100% attendance is required for short-term programs (individual course).

 

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