2014 - 2015 East Bay Yearlong Program

2014 - 2015 East Bay Yearlong Program

David Socholitzky, PhD, Chair
Diana Fuery, PhD, Sunny Kuegle, PsyD, Michael Levin, PsyD, Susan Yamaguchi, LCSW, Committee Members

At Work in the Bi-Personal Field:
The Contributions of Psychoanalytic Field Theory

In recent years the East Bay Yearlong Program has examined therapeutic interaction and change from a variety of perspectives.  This year we study Madeleine and Willy Baranger’s application of field theory to psychoanalysis, a work that some consider the equivalent of a Copernican Revolution in the understanding of interaction and clinical practice.

Field theory challenges us to think beyond the contemporary theories of mutual influence and transference-countertransference with which we are familiar, seeking to focus upon extending “thinkability” (A. Ferro), rather than upon the undoing of repressions or the recovery of past events. By attending, instead, to interaction in a dynamic bi-personal field, the Barangers and subsequent writers ask us to imagine an analytic field in which the current unconscious state of one participant cannot be understood without understanding the unconscious state of the other or of the field itself.  Andre Greene’s analytic object, Ogden’s analytic third, and Ferro’s characters “who describe the functioning of the field” are some of the contemporary metaphors developed to define the nature of this intersubjective field which is jointly and uniquely created by every analytic couple.

Our courses will examine field theory, different field theorists, and the model of clinical work inherent in the theory.  Critiques of the theory will also be discussed.  Each course will include a significant focus on clinical material, and a Case Conference will expand upon discussion of these ideas as they relate to attendees’ own cases.

Date: Fridays, September 5, 2014 - May 29, 2015
Time: 12:00noon - 01:30pm
Sessions: 34 Sessions
Location: The Dream Institute's Wisdom Room
1672 University Avenue
Berkeley, CA 94703
Tuition Fees: $ 1,150.00
Reader and CME/CE credit fees are not included in the tuition
see Registration and Fees, Refund Policy and CME/CE Credit Information tab for details
CME/CE: This program has been awarded a total of 49.5 CME/CE credits.
To Register: Click here to register for this program online
  
or call 415-563-5815

 

Introduction and Overview

In this first meeting we will discuss the year's program and provide time for members of the group to meet and begin to get to know one another.

David Socholitzky, PhD, Member, SFCP
Susan Yamaguchi, LCSWMember & Faculty, SFCP
Friday, September 5, 2014

 

Selected Topics in the Model of the Analytic Field

This section will explore certain clinically relevant assumptions in the Field Model, and some of their implications. The central assumptions derive from ideas from phenomenology and gestalt psychology, as well as early contributions from Bion and Matte-Blanco. We will look at how these assumptions lead to a theory of clinical work that is new, opening up fresh approaches to listening and interpreting. We will also interrogate some of the clinical limitations of the model. We will conclude our discussion by exploring the idea of a typology of fields (the perverse, evasive, and aesthetic field), and the ethics of an aesthetic field.

Selected passages from Bion, the Barangers,  de Leon de Bernardi, Merleau-Ponty, Gadamer, and Matte-Blanco will be considered.

Henry Markman, MDTraining & Supervising Analyst, Member & Faculty, SFCP, Personal & Supervising Analyst, PINC
Fridays, September 12, 19, 26; October 3, 2014
This seminar has been awarded 6 CME/CE credits.

Educational Objectives

Participants will be able to

  1. apply fundamental psychoanalytic principles to their clinical work in order to listen to and interpret patient's material as it relates to the current state of the bi-personal field.
  2. identify and listen for the impact of the bi-personal field upon the transference and countertransference in order to enhance their work with patients and the treatment process.
  3. provide an opportunity to hear case examples by faculty and to present participants' own case vignettes. They will apply treatment principles related to their new theoretical and listening skills related to course materials.
  4. use their new clinical skills in applying theory to work with clients from diverse backgrounds and genders. They will have acquired knowledge of social, cultural and political influences and concerns that shape clinical treatment within and outside of the therapeutic field.
  5. Use skills learned to identify heuristics for making the most effective use of theory to adapt to individual clinical needs of patients representing a wide range of diagnostic categories.

 

Exploring the Fundamental Ideas of Field Theory:
M. and W. Baranger's "The Analytic Situation as a Dynamic Field"

In this course we will read closely “The Analytic Situation As A Dynamic Field” (1961-2) and elaborate the theoretical and clinical reformulation of concepts such as the analytic situation, change, resistance, insight, interpretation and patient-therapist interaction that are embedded in the Barangers’ seminal paper.  In this paper each of these familiar analytic concepts is significantly reformulated to take account of its function within the field.

Topics to be discussed and integrated with  clinical examples from  the instructor and from participants are:  The unconscious situation of the field and the structuring of the field by the joint bi-personal unconscious fantasies of patient and therapist; The dynamic of the field as based upon projective and introjective identifications and counteridentifications; the concept of bastions—split-off aspects of the patient’s conscious and unconscious life--which must be reintegrated into the field. The bi-personal nature of interpretation and insight, both of which are aimed at restructuring the field rather than lifting repressions.   

Georgine Marrott, PhDTraining & Supervising Analyst, Member & Faculty, SFCP, Personal & Supervising Analyst, PINC
Fridays, October 10, 17, 24, 31, 2014
This seminar has been awarded 6 CME/CE credits.

Educational Objectives

Participants will be able to

  1. apply fundamental psychoanalytic principles to their clinical work to identify how the Barangers' reformulation of analytic concept changes the manner of listening to patients in a bi-personal field.
  2. identify the impact of these new ways of listening to the patient's transference and to their countertransference on order to enhance the treatment process.
  3. The course will provide an opportunity to her case examples by faulty and t present participants' own case vignettes. They will apply treatment principles related to their new theoretical and listening skills to better provide clinical services to patients.
  4. use their new clinical skills in applying theory to work with clients from diverse backgrounds and genders. They will have acquired knowledge of social, cultural and political influences and concerns that shape clinical treatment within and outside of the therapeutic field.
  5. use skills learned to identify heuristics for making the most effective use of theory to adapt to individual clinical needs of patients representing a wide range of diagnostic categories.

 

Why the Field Matters and What We Sense, Think and Do About It

In this short sequence we will highlight the significance of the analytic field concept and its multiple sensory, semiotic and symbolic registers. We will further distinguish between registering field phenomena as a means of establishing emotional contact and expanding what the field can contain through various levels of interpretation.  Throughout the class, we will maintain a comparative look at the field, considering points of confluence and divergence with other theoretical positions.

In this short segment we will choose readings from Civitarese, Ferro, Ogden, Stern, Peltz and Goldberg, Merleau-Ponty among others.

Rachel Peltz, PhDPersonal & Supervising Analyst, Member & Faculty, PINC, Supervision Analyst at the Massachusetts Institute of Psychoanalysis
Francisco J. Gonzalez, MDMember & Faculty, PINC, Assistant Editor of Psychoanalytic Dialogues and Contributing Editor of Studies in Gender and Sexuality
Fridays, November 7, 14, 21, 2014
This seminar has been awarded 4.5 CME/CE Credits

Educational Objectives

Participants will be able to

  1. apply fundamental psychoanalytic principles in order to be able to respond more fully to the multiple dimensions of the bi-personal field, and to be able to distinguish among the various levels of field phenomena and interpret them appropriately. They will also be able to listen for and respond appropriately to the impact of their interpretations upon the subsequent development of the field.
  2. understand and listen for the impact of interpretations of the bi-personal field upon the transference and countertransference phenomena within the field.
  3. This course will provide and opportunity to hear case examples by faculty and to present participant's own case vignettes. They will apply treatment principles related to their new theoretical and listening skills related to course material.
  4. use their new clinical skills in applying theory to work with clients from diverse backgrounds and genders. They will have acquired knowledge of social, cultural and political influences and concerns that shape clinical treatment within and outsideof the therapeutic field.
  5. use skills learned to identify heuristics for making the most effective use of theory to adapt to individual clinical needs of patients representing wide range of diagnostic categories.

 

Case Conference

David Socholitzky, PhDMember, SFCP
Susan Yamaguchi, LCSWMember & Faculty, SFCP
Depending upon enrollment, additional instructors may be added
Fridays, December 5, 12, 2014; January 9, 16, 23, 30; February 6, 2015
This seminar has been awarded 10.5 CME/CE credits.

Educational Objectives

Participants will be able to

  1. apply fundamental psychoanalytic principles to their clinical work, especially in the context of understanding the complex transference and countertransferences that develop in the bi-personal field.
  2. listen for and identify specific difficulties in treatment such as impasses, retreats and other barriers to therapeutic change as they relate to developments in the bi-personal field in order to enhance treatment effectiveness and improve patient care.
  3. The course will provide an opportunity to hear case examples by faculty and to present participants' own case vignettes. They will apply treatment principles related to their new theoretical and listening skills related to course material.
  4. use their new clinical skills in applying theory to work with clients from diverse backgrounds and genders. They wil have acquired knowledge of social, cultural and political influences and concerns that shape clinical treatment within and outside of the therapeutic field.
  5. use skills learned to identify heuristics for making the most effective use of theory to adapt to individual clinical needs of patients representing a wide range of diagnostic categories.

 

Let's Discuss: The Polemics of Co-Construction/Engagement with Separateness

Since you have been deeply engaged in the previous three seminars on aspects of the field model and, in particular, the concept of co-construction, let’s take time now in this short section to assess what we see as the clinical benefits of the bipersonal field theory as articulated by the Barangers and others as well as what might be some hidden drawbacks of the theory.  Different understanding of counterransference phenomena will also be considered.

Readings will include the work of Warren Poland, Hans Loewald, Heinrich Racker amongst others.

Abby Wolfson, PhDTraining & Supervising Analyst, Member & Faculty, SFCP, Personal & Supervising Analyst, PINC
Fridays, February 13, 20, 27, 2015
This seminar has been awarded 4.5 CME/CE credits.

Educational Objectives

Participants will be able to

  1. apply fundamental psychoanalytic principles to their clinical work to understand the implications for clinical work of differences between the ideas of field theory and other theories of co-construction in the field of clinical interaction, in order to enhance flexibility in applying what they have learned about theories of the therapeutic field in conducting treatments in order to enhance patient care.
  2. listen for and identify experiences in the therapeutic field with the aim of applying the appropriate theoretical construct in order to understand the transference and countertransference events occurring in the field so that they can interpret the state of the field to themselves and to the patient to further advance the treatment.
  3. The course will provide an opportunity to hear case examples by faculty and to present participants' own case vignettes. They will apply treatment principles related to their new theoretical and listening skills related to course material.
  4. use their new clinical skills in applying theory to work with clients from diverse backgrounds and genders. They wil have acquired knowledge of social, cultural and political influences and concerns that shape clinical treatment within and outside of the therapeutic field.
  5. use skills learned to identify heuristics for making the most effective use of theory to adapt to individual clinical needs of patients representing a wide range of diagnostic categories.

 

Creating and Actualizing the Field with New Patients

According to Antonino Ferro, every pairing of a therapist and a patient creates a unique field to which each contributes.  But before the field can be created, therapist and patient have to agree to work together.  This course examines the conditions under which that agreement is reached or not reached.

We will examine characteristics of potential patients that are positive or negative for a successful therapeutic engagement, such qualities as “psychological mindedness” “capacity for empathy” ‘ability to tolerate frustration” and related qualities that are positive or negative for therapeutic success. We also discuss topics as when therapy may be said to begin; the fantasies that our potential patients have about us and we about them; and the dynamics of the initial interview.  Finally, we examine how we and our potential patients go about deciding whether there is a good fit; whether the relationship will be a fruitful one; and what compromises each is willing to make in order to actualize the potential therapeutic field.

Sandra Bemesderfer, PhDTraining & Supervising Analyst, Member & Faculty, SFCP, Personal & Supervising Analyst, PINC
Fridays, March 6, 13, 20, 2015
This seminar has been awarded 4.5 CME/CE credits.

Educational Objectives

Participants will be able to

  1. apply fundamental psychoanalytic principles to their clinical work in order to identify during the initial interview positive and negative characteristics of patient-therapist interaction in the bi-personal field as they relate to the patient's capacity to contribute to the productive development and actualization of the field. They will also learn to understand the concept of the "good fit", how to recognize its presence and how to help facilitate it if possible.
  2. understand and listen for and recognize the initial fantasies of patients about their therapist and the therapist's own fantasies about the patienti n order to enhance treatment effectiveness and improve patient care by facilitating the actualization of the field..
  3. The course will provide an opportunity to hear case examples by faculty and to present participants' own case vignettes. They will apply treatment principles related to their new theoretical and listening skills related to course material.
  4. use their new clinical skills in applying theory to work with clients from diverse backgrounds and genders. They will have also acquired knowledge of social, cultural and political influences and concerns that shape clinical treatment within and outside of the therapeutic field.
  5. use skills learned to identify heuristics for making the most effective use of theory to adapt to individual clinical needs of patients representing a wide range of diagnostic categories.

 

Reciprocity in the Clinical Field

This course will explore how patient and therapist locate one another in the structuring of the bi-personal analytic field in the clinical present.  We will apply an understanding of emotional and mental reciprocity in formulating a perspective of interpersonal work using field theory.  We will recognize the challenges to our thinking individually or together with our patients in the face of powerful but unconscious and unseen obstacles to therapeutic action—bastions, impasses, and negative therapeutic actions.  We will also reacquaint ourselves from a new perspective with such familiar concepts as trauma and phantasy, including our notion of time as sequential. The class will include clinical material from the Instructor and attendees for illustrative purposes.

Readings will include the work of M. and W. Baranger, J.M. Mom and A. Ferro.

Margot Beattie, PhDMember & Faculty, SFCP
Fridays, March 27; April 3, 10, 17, 24, 2015
This seminar has been awarded 7.5 CME/CE credits.

Educational Objectives

Participants will be able to

  1. apply fundamental psychoanalytic principles to their clinical work to understand how to use the concept of mother-infant reciprocity to better listen to patients from the perspective of field theory to enhance their understanding of transferences and countertransferences as they arise in the bi-personal field. They will also be able to identify and understand the development of unseen obstacles to treatment in order to enhance their clinical skills and abilities to conduct successful treatments.
  2. listen for and utilize the concepts of the bi-personal field and reciprocity to develop a new perspective on concepts of phantasy and trauma.
  3. The course will provide an opportunity to hear case examples by faculty and to present participants' own case vignettes. They will apply treatment principles related to their new theoretical and listening skills related to course material.
  4. use their new clinical skills in applying theory to work with clients from diverse backgrounds and genders. They wil have acquired knowledge of social, cultural and political influences and concerns that shape clinical treatment within and outside of the therapeutic field.
  5. use skills learned to identify heuristics for making the most effective use of theory to adapt to individual clinical needs of patients representing a wide range of diagnostic categories.

 

The Field of Dreams: Dreams in the Therapeutic Dyad

The royal road, built in an era of individualism and conquest, has been taken in therapy and analysis primarily by patients’ dreams.  A new era of intersubjectivity and interconnection allows us to look at dreams and dreaming as field phenomena emerging within the therapeutic dyad.  Patients and therapists dream about one another often; the majority of such dreams refer to an intensified interactive field.    Examples will be given of dreams from the beginning, middle, and ending of treatment to illustrate how dreams from both parties can function as wise consultants to the process.  Participants are encouraged to bring in dreams of their patients and of their own.   Brief mention will be made of recent work in neuropsychology and evolutionary studies, which lend exciting confirmation of how our dreaming mind, with its wider bandwidth, has evolved to keep track of self, other, and the interpersonal field around.

Readings will be from M. Blechner, W. Bonime, L.Brown, L. Caligor, M. khan, P. Lippmann, R. Whitman, W. Milner.

Meredith Sabini, PhDan analytically trained psychologist, is the Director of The Dream Institute and currently works as a dream consultant to therapists and to the public.
Fridays, May 1, 8, 15, 29, 2015 (no class on May 22)
This seminar has been awarded 6 CME/CE credits.

Educational Objectives

Participants will be able to

  1. apply fundamental psychoanalytic principles to their clinical work to listen for and identify references to the state of the interactive field in patients' dreams and in their own dreams. They will also learn to identify ways dreams from each phase of therapy may refer to issues of that phase in dreams of patients and therapists. they will also learn to use dreams from each phase of treatment to enhance the understanding of transferences and countertransferences in order to improve the treatment process.
  2. listen for and identify the manner in which patients' dreams and therapists' dreams refer to internal and interpersonal experiences of both in the field and how to use these dreams to guide their understanding of the current state of the field in order to enhance the treatment process.
  3. The course will provide an opportunity to hear case examples including dreams by faculty and to present participants' own case vignettes including dreams of patients and their own. They will apply treatment principles related to their new theoretical and listening skills related to course material.
  4. use their new clinical skills in applying theory to work with clients from diverse backgrounds and genders. They will have acquired knowledge of social, cultural and political influences and concerns that shape clinical treatment within and outside of the therapeutic field.
  5. use skills learned to identify heuristics for making the most effective use of theory to adapt to individual clinical needs of patients representing a wide range of diagnostic categories.

Eligibility

This program is designed for psychotherapists seeking further education in psychoanalytic psychotherapy. Registration is for a seminar series not combined with a continuous case conference or for an individual course. Participants in treatment with one of the instructors should inquire about the opportunity to take a comparable course in one of the other programs.

If you have any questions about your level of preparation, please contact either of the East Bay Extension Division Yearlong Chair: David Socholitzky, Ph.D., at 510-548-3913.

* A small number of participants with academic or artistic backgrounds may apply to the seminar series with permission of the Chair of the SFCP Extension Division. The Chair will consider these applications case-by-case and offer participation as space allows. In addition, anyone participating must meet with the Chair to discuss confidentiality rules concerning clinical material and sign an agreement to uphold confidentiality.

 

Registration

 

Course Tuition Fee and Refund Policy

  • Fee is $ 1,150.00;  A $ 300.00 deposit is due upon registration.  This $ 300.00 is refundable until August 1, 2014.  The remaining balance will be due in full by August 15, 2014 and is not refundable; A two-installment plan is available for this program.  If applying for installment plan, you must arrange with the office by September 1, 2014.  Please click here for Installment Plan detail.
     
  • cost of readers and CME/CE credits fees are not included in tuition.

 

Discounted Fee

Only one of the following discounts can be used for each registration:

  • Community Members may deduct 10% from the registration fees.
  • Students may deduct 25% from the registration fees with student ID provided at the time of registration.

 

Readers Fee

Charges for reading material required for the seminars are not included in tuition. They are based upon copyright laws and change based on the content of the readers. The charges will be billed to you separately. Please submit your registration and your tuition payment two weeks in advance in order to receive reading materials before the course starting date.

 

CME/CE Credit Fee

This program has been awarded a total of 49.5 CME/CE credits. The credits cost per hour is $10 for all SFCP members, and $12 for non SFCP members. SFCP has established a cap cost of $200 for credits requested per program. The cost of CME/CE credits is separate from the programs fees and billed individually upon the request for credits at the end of the seminar.

 

CME/CE Attendance Requirements

  • Physicians, Social Workers, Marriage and Family Therapists, and Registered Nurses will be awarded AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ on an hour for hour basis; see the program description for the maximum of credits awarded for each program.
  • Psychologists participating in long-term programs (lecture series) who can demonstrate a minimum of 80% attendance for a seminar within the series, are eligible to obtain these credits by notifying the SFCP office after the seminar has ended. Seminars of 4 sessions or fewer require 100% attendance. Participants will pay the appropriate fee for the seminar (based on the number of credits they obtain), and then will receive a verification letter of their attendance.
  • 100% attendance is required for short-term programs (individual course).

 

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