2014 - 2015 Child Psychotherapy Training Program

2014 - 2015 Child Psychotherapy Training Program

Laurie Goldsmith, PhD, Christina Lapides, LCSW, Louis Roussel, PhD and Celeste Schneider, PhD, Co-Chairs

Latency and Adolescence

Psychoanalytically oriented treatment of children and adolescents makes demands on the therapist that are different than treatment of adults. Older children are on the thresholds of new experiences of their minds and bodies. How do we reach these inner worlds when they often can't use words to tell us about their experience? The current year of this two-year program addresses school-age children and adolescents. Children often communicate through play, but some can't play. Adolescents may express themselves through actions, including actions on their bodies. The therapist has to bring together the child's behaviors, and their own countertransference reactions, to try to arrive at the underlying meanings of the child's world. This two year series of seminars addresses the relational, environmental and intrapsychic processes for both child and parents, and offers in-depth examples of interventions. The seminars use class discussion, readings, and case presentations by instructors and participants. Attention will be paid to different theoretical orientations and to
cultural and sexual diversity. Students may enter at either year. Students are entitled to attend all child colloquia held at SFCP. Students will be subscribed to PEP-WEB through SFCP and will become SFCP Community members.

Certificate Program Option
The Child Psychotherapy Seminar is offering interested students the option of completing a certificate program. Upon completion of the program the student will be awarded a certificate from SFCP stating that they have completed the pro-gram in Child Psychotherapy Training. In order to receive the certificate, the student must:

  • Complete the two year curriculum; and
  • Complete 40 hours of supervision with a supervisor chosen from any Child Psychotherapy Training faculty, including those not currently teaching. Reduced fee supervision may be available if needed.
Date: Wednesdays, September 10, 2014 - May 27, 2015
Time: 07:30pm - 09:00pm
Sessions: 32 Sessions
CME/CE: This program has been awarded a total of 48 CME/CE credits.
Location: San Francisco Center for Psychoanalysis
444 Natoma Street
San Francisco, CA 94103
Tuition Fees: $ 1,550.00  General
$ 1,450.00  Students with a copy of Student ID provided
CME/CE credit fees are not included in the tuition
see Registration and Fees, Refund Policy, and CME/CE Credits Information tab for details
CME/CE: This program has been awarded a total of 48 CME/CE credits.
To Register: Click here to download the Child Psychotherapy Training Program Application Form

 

Orientation/Latency in the Consulting Room

The first day of this course will begin with an orientation to the Child Psychotherapy Training year, with all faculty attending to introduce their seminars.  The course will focus on the intriguing developmental stage of Latency.  What do we mean by latent?  Are we thinking of an age, a stage, a position, a construct, or a state of being?  Clinical material will illustrate these different aspects of the “latency period” as they emerge between therapist and child.  We will discuss assessment of latency development in the context of recommendations for treatment and treatment goals, and consider the parent’s role in the child’s treatment.

Marsha Silverstein, PhDMember & Faculty, SFCP
Wednesdays, September 10, 17; October 1, 8, 15, 22, 2014
This seminar has been awarded 9 CME/CE credits.

Educational Objectives:
Participant will be able to

  1. describe the developmental stage of Latency and the associated states and traits through case material.
  2. explore the interrelations between the emotionally vivid interactions between therapist and the latency age child in the consulting room.
  3. describe various theoretical perspectives on infant observation, including the complexity of the latency aged child’s cultural identity.
  4. describe the complexities of working with parents of the latency age child.

 

Thinking Clinically: Pre-Adolescence and the Transition to Adolescence

The transition to adolescence is a dynamic and intense one.  It is a time of gathering and transforming oneself while confronted by changes in one’s body and one’s thinking.  At the same time, infantile issues always are present with more evolved processes and feel particularly ripe in this transitional process to adolescence.  Concepts such as the paranoid-schizoid and depressive positions, container/contained, and après coup can provide a scaffolding for thinking about these development processes and help highlight the ways that one is negotiating multiple ages at one time.  This class will develop these ideas as we look at the world of the pre-adolescent and the approach to adolescence.

Reyna Cowan, PsyD, LCSWFaculty, SFCP, Member, PINC
Wednesdays, October 29; November 5, 12, 19; December 3, 10, 2014
This seminar has been awarded 9 CME/CE credits.

Dr. Reyna Cowan is a member of the Psychoanalytic Institute of Northern California (PINC). She is faculty at SFCP and has taught for ACCESS Institute, NCSPP, PINC, SFCP and The Psychotherapy Institute. She sees adults, children, adolescents and couples in the Rockridge area of Oakland.

Educational Objectives:
Participant will be able to

  1. understand how to think about paranoid-schizoid and depressive positions as a way to understand the emotional life of the child.
  2. comprehend the concept container/contained and how it can be used to understand development.
  3. formulate an idea of how to use one’s countertransference in clinical work.
  4. learn how to use the squiggle game as a way to understand the internal world of the child.
  5. develop a working understanding of the no entry defense.
  6. utilize these developmental concepts while listening to clinical material in class.

 

Psychological Movements in Adolescence

This tour of adolescence will focus on some of the developmental tasks considered “normative” in the adolescent period of development.  These tasks are familiar to many of us and include subjects such as gender identity consolidation; sexual orientation and sexual experience; the development of abstract thinking and the capacity to use one’s mind; a reworking of oedipal fantasies and feelings in the service of a separate self.  These psychological movements will be discussed within the context of the social realities of middle school and high school with an eye on the intersection between the social and the psychological.  The use of clinical material will be encouraged as ways to illuminate the challenges and demands for children during this period of growth.

Diana C. Fuery, PhD, LCSWMember & Faculty, SFCP
Wednesdays, January 7, 14, 21, 28; February 4, 11, 2015
This seminar has been awarded 9 CME/CE credits.

Educational Objectives:
Participant will be able to

  1. give an overview of the developmental stage of adolescence.
  2. list the major normative tasks of adolescence.
  3. describe the social context of early, middle and late adolescence with an emphasis on the influence this context has on development.
  4. discuss some of the significant developmental changes in adolescent development with a focus on sexuality and cognitive changes.
  5. recognize the clinical presentation of some of these normative adolescent developments as distinct from clinical conditions.

 

Bodily Centered Psychopathology in Adolescence

This course will examine the frequent presentation of symptoms by adolescents, which are played out in, or on, the body, such as anorexia and bulimia, cutting, drug use and overdosing.  We will consider the profound and concrete physiological changes of adolescence, and the resultant anxieties, fantasies and repercussions on the personality.  The bizarre and disturbing presentation of bodily-based symptoms will be understood within the construct of the more general shift of the personality in adolescence, sometimes revealing more primitive parts of the self.

Mary Brady, PhDMember & Faculty, SFCP
Wednesdays, February 18, 25; March 4, 18, 25, 2015
This seminar has been awarded 7.5 CME/CE credits.

Educational Objectives:
Participant will be able to

  1. describe the normal developmental processes related to the integration of the changing body in adolescence.
  2. assess the relationship between adolescent development and the frequent presentation of adolescent patients with bodily symptoms, such as anorexia, bulimia, cutting, substance abuse and overdosing.
  3. describe the manner in which symptoms in adolescence can represent aspects of primitive object relationships which have remained unintegrated to this point.
  4. list issues relevant to male adolescent development.
  5. list issues relevant to female adolescent development.
  6. explain some dynamics underlying eating disorders.

 

Case Conference

Participants will have the chance to present their own case material to their fellow classmates and to two experienced clinicians.

Era A. Loewenstein, Ph.D.Member & Faculty, SFCP
Jack Giuliani, Ph.D.Member & Faculty, SFCP
Wednesdays, April 1, 8, 15, 22, 29; May 6, 2015
This seminar has been awarded 9 CME/CE credits.

Educational Objectives:
Participant will be able to

  1. become involved in an intensive & appropriate therapeutic interaction.
  2. observe and reflect upon the processes within the therapeutic interaction.
  3. identify the most appropriate points for therapeutic interventions.
  4. observe and listen for the responses to their therapeutic interventions.
  5. integrate this response into further interactions, reflection and interventions.
  6. consider and adjust their interventions to the developing therapeutic process.

 

Integrative Seminar: What can we Learn from the Parallels between Adult and Child Treatments?

We will discuss case examples that explore the differences and similarities between a child's' play-work and an adults' play-work, acting out , enactment and other related processes.

Zenobia Grusky, PhDMember & Faculty, SFCP
Wednesdays, May 13, 20, 27, 2015
This seminar has been awarded 4.5 CME/CE credits.

Educational Objectives:
Participant will be able to

  1. define the theory and technique behind the use of play with children.
  2. define theory and technique behind the use of enactment with adults.
  3. keeping the above in mind, reflect on how the process of the child therapeutic interaction is similar and different from the therapy process with adults.
  4. integrate these observations and present some creative examples to the class that will enrich our work with both children and adults: i.e. experimental uses of fantasy play with adults, uses of the couch with adults and experimental ways of working with parents while working with children.

Certificate Program Option

The Child Psychotherapy Training Program is offering interested students the option of completing a certificate program.  Upon completion of the program the student will be awarded a certificate from SFCP stating that they have complete the program in Child Psychotherapy Training.  In order to receive the certificate, the student must:

  • complete the two year curriculum; and
  • complete 40 hours of supervision with a supervisor chosen from any Child Psychotherapy Seminar faculty, including those not currently teaching.  Reduced fee supervision may be available if needed.

 

 

Eligibility

If you have any questions about your level of preparation, please contact the SFCP Office at 415-563-5815.

 

Registration

You are required to submit a brief Summary of Experience when you apply for the program.

 

Course Tuition Fee and Refund Policy

  • Fee is $ 1,550.00 or $ 1,450.00 if you provide a copy of your current Student ID.  A $ 300.00 deposit is due upon registration.  This $ 300.00 deposit is fully refundable until August 1, 2014.  The remaining balance is due in full by August 15, 2014 and is non-refundable; A two-installment plan is available for this program.  If applying for installment plan, you must arrange with the office by September 1, 2014.  Please click here for Installment Plan detail.
     
  • cost of CME/CE credits fees is not included in tuition.

 

Readers and Community Membership Fee

Charges for reading material and your Community Membership fees are included in tuition.  Your Community Membership will start on the date you registered, and it will end on June 30, 2015.

 

CME/CE Credit Fee

This program has been awarded a total of 48 CME/CE credits. The credits cost per hour is $10. SFCP has established a cap cost of $200 for credits requested per program. The cost of CME/CE credits is separate from the programs fees and billed individually upon the request for credits at the end of the seminar.

 

CME/CE Attendance Requirements

  • Physicians, Social Workers, Marriage and Family Therapists, and Registered Nurses will be awarded AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ on an hour for hour basis; see the program description for the maximum of credits awarded for each program.
  • Psychologists participating in long-term programs (lecture series) who can demonstrate a minimum of 80% attendance for a seminar within the series, are eligible to obtain these credits by notifying the SFCP office after the seminar has ended. Seminars of 4 sessions or fewer require 100% attendance. Participants will pay the appropriate fee for the seminar (based on the number of credits they obtain), and then will receive a verification letter of their attendance.
  • 100% attendance is required for short-term programs (individual course).

 

Go to top